Dean Kerry King

Dean Guitars is honored to release the Kerry King V Black Satin Signature Guitar. King, Slayer's founding guitarist, is one of the most instantly recognizable and revered musicians in the industry. Over the past 40 years, his brutal riffs helped write the history of heavy metal and create the uncompromising thrash metal genre, making him one of the most respected guitarists on the planet.


The Dean Kerry King V Black Satin Signature Guitar features a mahogany body with a beveled flat maple top, and a three-piece maple set-thru neck with a 24.75 scale length, Kerry King C-shape satin-finished neck, ebony fingerboard, 24 jumbo frets and King's crossed nail inlays.

In addition, the guitar is loaded with an EMG 81 bridge pickup complete with PA2 Preamp Booster, an EMG 85 neck pickup, a Kahler Hybrid tremolo system with a Floyd Rose nut, a volume/PA2 (on/off) and tone knob, three-way switch, Grover tuners and black satin finish with black hardware.

"I'm super stoked to be part of the Dean Guitars family," said King. "This has been an insane long time coming! Together we're going to create some amazing guitars that Dean, Slayer and Kerry King fans will be as excited as I am to play them. It's gonna be a wild ride for years to come!"

"Kerry King bleeds everything Dean Guitars is all about," said Dean Guitars Vice President of Products, Eric Stewart. "We could not be more honored to work with Kerry to create his signature weapons of mass destruction – definitely not for the faint of heart."

The Dean Kerry King V Black Satin guitar features a hardshell case and is available for $1,399.00 at authorized Dean dealers. For more information, go to www.deanguitars.com.

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

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