Interstellar Audio Machines Introduces the Octonaut Hyperdrive

Boutique guitar effects design house Interstellar Audio Machines (IAM) announces the release of their flagship guitar effect pedal: The Octonaut Hyperdrive.


The Octonaut Hyperdrive transparent overdrive delivers the unattainable cosmic tone of the gods at an affordable price. Using the iconic Klon Centaur's circuitry as a benchmark reference, the team at IAM realized the pedal's magical sound and expressive dynamic response through detailed analysis and craftmanship. Pair this little guy with any guitar rig and the resultant tone will lead to massive planetary destruction!

In addition to classic tone, the pedal offers selectable true bypass / buffered switching: you can choose your preferred mode via an internal switch. Legendary and professional guitarists alike are flocking to get their hands on the Octonaut. These early adopters include Jimmy Herring of Widespread Panic, Zach Myers of Shinedown, Pete Loeffler of Chevelle, John (JB) Bell of Widespread Panic, and Jesse Triplett of Collective Soul.

Interstellar Audio Machines - Octonaut Hyperdrive Promo

Highlights

  • Internal switch for selecting True Bypass vs. Buffered Bypass
  • Dual-ganged gain pot makes dialing in your tone a breeze
  • Rare Germanium diodes
  • Refined all-analog circuit design provides pure, ultra-consistent performance
  • Modern IC3 circuitry offering maximum headroom
The Octonaut Hyperdrive pedal carries an MSRP of $299.99 and a street price of $199.99 each. They're available at select retailers and can also be purchased directly from the Interstellar Audio Machines online store at www.interstellaraudiomachines.com
Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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