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Lamb of God Delivers Scorching Take on a Bad Brains Classic

Lamb of God

"I Against I" features Fever 333 vocalist Jason Aalon Butler in a new live quarantine video that captures the raw energy of the band.

Lamb of God has premiered a scorching cover of the Bad Brains classic "I Against I" featuring Fever 333 vocalist Jason Aalon Butler in a new live quarantine video that captures the raw energy and spirit of this cult classic.


Lamb of God - I Against I (Live Quarantine Video) ft. FEVER 333

Lamb of God vocalist Randy Blythe states, "The idea to cover "I Against I" goes back at least 20 years to a camping trip the band was on. Mark & I were sitting in the back of our buddy's Jeep ripping through the mountains, Bad Brains was cranking on the stereo, & I was singing along to that particular song. Mark looked over at me & said "We should cover that tune." So we thought about it for a couple of decades and finally got around to doing it for the Burn The Priest Legion: XX record (hey, sometimes we move a little slow...)

As we all know, this pandemic has sucked for live music, but the quarantine jams bands have been doing have been pretty fun, especially when you bring in guests. I saw Fever 333 for the first time at the Sonic Temple fest— I had never listened to them, but I was blown away by their live show. I remember thinking "Man, these dudes are WILD- their energy reminds me of the punk shows I saw in the 80's" and I've been friends with those dudes from that day. I even texted Darryl from Bad Brains that afternoon to tell him to check them out. It was only natural to ask Jason to join us & bring that energy to this song by the almighty Bad Brains, my favorite band of all time."

Fever 333 vocalist Jason Aalon Butler says, "It is truly an honor to be a part of this one as I have the utmost respect for Randy and the boys since becoming homies after having my mind blown when I looked over at the side of the stage at Sonic Temple Fest and saw him watching us play. It's been a pleasure getting to know him and an honor to rock L.O.G. celebrating one of the most important punk rock/musical acts of all time Bad Brains. From legends to legends to the student. All love."

For more information:
Lamb of God

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