Vongon Introduces the Ultrasheer

Adding to the burgeoning company's product line of forward-thinking effects, Vongon has unveiled the new Ultrasheer reverb and vibrato pedal. With reverb modeled after the classic Lexicon 224 unit of the late 70s, and the vibrato being a digital pitch shifter that doesn't alter the sound, Ultrasheer offers up lush, fluid warbles that will effortlessly find a home on your pedal board or your studio's patchbay.


The reverb algorithm is based on the plate reverb sounds of the classic Lexicon 224 from 1978. The vibrato is a smooth and transparent digital pitch shifter that preserves the full bandwidth of your input signal without darkening the sound, which can be an issue with its analog counterparts. Two modulation waveforms are available: Cycle, which is a sine wave for classic Leslie-speaker-type sounds, and Random, which is a smoothed sample-and-hold waveform that creates pitch warbles similar to a warped vinyl or sun-baked cassette.

Features

  • 32 bit floating point DSP (except for 16 bit vintage reverb algorithm)
  • Independent bypass switches for Reverb and Vibrato for two effects in one package
  • Full bandwidth vibrato that doesn't darken the tone
  • Stereo / Mono modes automatically selected based on the cables plugged in
  • Wooden enclosure milled from single block of dark walnut
  • Matte black aluminum faceplate with gold traces

Vongon Ultrasheer with Electric Guitar

All Vongon pedals are designed and built in the company's Bay Area home. Street price is $449. Available in limited quantities directly from Vongon at www.vongon.com and through select dealers.

Flexible filtering options and a vicious fuzz distinguish the Tool bass master’s signature fuzz-wah.

Great quality filters that sound good independently or combined. Retains low end through the filter spectrum. Ability to control wah and switch on fuzz simultaneously. Very solid construction.

Fairly heavy. A bit expensive.

$299

Dunlop JCT95 Justin Chancellor Cry Baby Wah
jimdunlop.com

4.5
4
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Options for self-expression through pedals are almost endless these days. It’s almost hard to imagine a sonic void that can’t be filled by a single pedal or some combination of them. But when I told bass-playing colleagues about the new Dunlop Justin Chancellor Cry Baby—which combines wah and fuzz tuned specifically for bass—the reaction was universal curiosity and marvel. It seems Dunlop is scratching an itch bass players have been feeling for quite some time.

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Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

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