Greg Howe Eddie Van Halen

The session and shred master discusses his favorite Van Halen jams and articulates how Eddie amazed the masses by melding motion and fire.


The 30-episode podcast will be available exclusively through dweezilzappa.com and packages will include listening parties, Q&A sessions, "Brown Sound" bonus episodes, custom Axe-FX, Helix, and Kemper presets, a 1-year subscription to Premier Guitar, and much more.

A portion of the proceeds will go to benefit Mr. Holland's Opus Foundation and Feeding America.

Presented by Walrus Audio

Jack Broadbent on John Lee Hooker | Hooked

The flask-sliding swashbuckler's turning point with guitar was hearing (and absorbing) the Delta bluesman's thumping, percussive rhythms.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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