Tthe DC3 and the NF3 feature proprietary PRS pickups and PRS''s all new flat body shape for a classic look and sound.

Stevensville, MD (September 21, 2010) – PRS Guitars’ newest three-pickup electric guitars, the DC3 and the NF3, feature proprietary PRS pickups and PRS's all new flat body shape for a classic look and sound. Both models also come standard with PRS’s new retro “V12” finish, “Pattern Regular” neck shape, and a PRS Tremolo bridge system with steel components that give a clear and expansive tone.


NF3

The DC3 is a modernized, vintage inspired three single-coil pickup guitar with an alder body. Its three proprietary PRS DC3 single-coil pickups are based on PRS’s award wining 513 platform and give the DC3 a warm, clear tone. The NF3 introduces a korina body and three proprietary Narrowfield pickups. Narrowfields use the same wire as 57/08s, but are narrower pole to pole and deeper front to back, providing exceptional clarity. Both models combine a three-pickup configuration with a five-way blade switch to provide a multitude of sounds, and both feature bolt-on necks, 3-ply pickguards, and mounted electronics.


DC3

Other appointments shared by the DC3 and NF3 models include 22 frets, 25.25” scale length, maple neck and fretboard with rosewood option, “Pattern Regular” neck shape, ring dot inlays, PRS low mass locking tuners, nickel hardware with gold option, and volume and tone controls.

DC3 Finish: Antique White, Black, Charcoal Smokeburst, Frost Blue Metallic, McCarty Tobacco Sunburst, Powder Blue, Seafoam Green, Sapphire Smokeburst, Scarlet Smokeburst, Smoked Amber, Tri-Color Sunburst, Vintage Burst, Vintage Cherry

NF3 Finish: Antique White, Black, Charcoal, Frost Blue Metallic, McCarty Tobacco Sunburst, Natural, Powder Blue, Seafoam Green, Smoked Amber, Tri-Color Sunburst, Vintage Burst, Vintage Cherry, White Wash

For more information:
PRS

Source: Press Release
Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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