Roland Announces First Battery Powered Acoustic Amp, the AC-33

The AC-33 is the world’s first AA battery-powered amp designed specifically for the acoustic guitar.

Anaheim, CA (January 15, 2010) — The popular AC-Series line of acoustic amps from Roland gains a new member with the arrival of the AC-33 Acoustic Chorus Guitar Amplifier. Designed for both high-quality sound and supreme portability, the AC-33 is the world’s first AA battery-powered amp designed specifically for the acoustic guitar. It features instrument, XLR microphone, and AUX inputs, along with built-in digital effects, an anti-feedback function, an onboard looper, and an integrated tilt stand for enhanced sound projection.

With the ability to run on eight AA batteries (including NiMH rechargeable types) or AC power, the AC-33 is the perfect amplifier for acoustic performers on the go. The high-efficiency 30-watt stereo amp and dual 5” speakers provide excellent sound coverage for any intimate performance situation, including restaurants, coffee houses, open mic nights, street busking, and more. The multiple audio inputs allow the AC-33 to function as a portable PA, amplifying a guitar, vocal, and backing track from a music player all at the same time.

The AC-33 comes equipped with Roland’s famous stereo chorus effect, as well as easy-to-use reverb and ambience effects. For worry-free playing in high-volume situations, the unique anti-feedback function automatically detects acoustic instrument feedback and eliminates it before it starts. The onboard looper allows users to record and play back up to 40 seconds of on-the-fly musical backing, with the ability to capture unlimited “sound on sound” style overdubs. The looper and effects can both be controlled with optional foot switches.

The AC-33 is scheduled to ship in January with a suggested retail price of $558.50.

For more information:
Roland

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