Tascam Unveils DP-24SD Digital Portastudio

A 24-track studio with built-in effects, eight mic inputs, and 12-encoder channel strip.

Montebello, CA (April 9, 2015) -- TASCAM has introduced the DP-24SD, a 24-track Digital Portastudio that’s simple to use to keep musicians creative. The latest model records to rugged solid-state media – economical and expandable SD Cards. Eight XLR mic inputs with phantom power provide enough preamps to record a full band, and each input has available compression and limiting during recording. A color LCD display, channel control strip, and a range of effects make the DP-24SD the ultimate production station for musicians.

Built into the DP-24SD are three types of effects. Up to eight dynamics effects can be routed to any or all inputs during recording for polished-sounding tracks. A multieffects processor provides amp simulation, delay, chorus, and more, ideal for using with the direct guitar input. And a adjustable reverb is available on send and return.

With a simple-to-use interface and affordable pricing, the DP-24SD is the ideal system for musicians, performers, and songwriters.

Features:

  • 24-track / 24-bit Digital Portastudio
  • Color LCD display
  • 12-encoder channel strip
  • Eight microphone inputs on combo XLR-1/4” jacks with phantom power
  • 1/4” instrument level input
  • Up to eight-track simultaneous recording at 48kHz/24- bit audio resolution
  • Solid-state recording to SD Card media for better shock resistance than hard drive recording
  • Multi-effect processor with guitar amp simulation
  • Mastering effect
  • Virtual tracks for alternate takes and undo
  • Built-in chromatic tuner and metronome?
  • 1?4” monitor, effect send, and headphone outputs
  • USB 2.0 connection to computer

For more information:
Tascam

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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