TheGigRig Releases Z Cable

The Z Cable mimics the complex behavior of a guitar pickup, sending your amp a signal that is almost identical to what comes out of your guitar, bringing back all the sparkle, detail and depth of the original guitar signal, but with your effects integrated into the sound.

Wilts, UK (April 27, 2011) -- UK company, TheGigRig, known for their pedalboard switching systems and accessories, has released the Z Cable. The Z Cable is designed to sit at the end of your signal chain where it, "tricks your amp into thinking it's seeing the signal direct from your guitar."

TheGigRig says that the Z Cable mimics the complex behavior of a guitar pickup, sending your amp a signal that is almost identical to what comes out of your guitar, bringing back all the sparkle, detail and depth of the original guitar signal, but with your effects integrated into the sound.

Features:
  • Reactance control: fine tunes the Z Cable's performance to match the sound of your guitar, from warm and round to bright and sharp.
  • Cable switch: a rotary switch selects the length of guitar cable you want the Z Cable to imitate, with settings for long, medium, or short cables or active output (zero cable length simulation). 
  • Ins & Outs: standard quarter inch jack input, XLR output. An XLR to standard jack cable is included, with three length options – Studio (4 metres/12 feet), Stage (8 metres/24 feet) and Stadium (12 metres/36 feet). The XLR jack locks in place for added security, and patent-applied-for Z Cable technology ensures that there's absolutely no audio loss between the Z Cable unit and your amp.
  • Power: the Z Cable is powered by a standard, Boss-style 9V DC mains adapter, so it can run off the same supply as your pedals.
The Z Cable will available from the beginning of May, direct from www.TheGigRig.com:
Z Cable Studio (4 metres/12 feet) – £149.00
Z Cable Stage (8 metres/24 feet) – £169.00
Z Cable Stadium (12 metres/36 feet) – £189.00

For more information:
TheGigRig
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