Origin Effects Halcyon Green Overdrive Demo | First Look

John Bohlinger demos an "adaptive" drive that yields classic TS-style tones—with the option to dial out the midrange hump.

A fiery high-gain fuzz that stretches convention.

Wide range of hot-to-blazing fuzz sounds. Cleans up remarkably well for a high-gain device. Momentary footswitch enables quick fuzz blasts. Lifetime warranty.

Would be nice to have external access to the internal trimmers

$149

MAS Effects Sona Fuzz
mas-effects.com

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With a very non-traditional Queen of Hearts graphic, sunshine yellow enclosure (one of three available finishes), and gold knobs, the MAS Effects Sona Fuzz is striking. But more important to any guitarist who likes things loud, it’s a high-gain unit that goes beyond traditional buzzy sounds. The Sona Fuzz is the brainchild of pedal builder Mark A. Stratman, a former software engineer who is also the founder of We Build Planes (a community of amateur aircraft builders). Given Startman’s CV, it’s not surprising that the true bypass Sona Fuzz is exceptionally well built. So much so that it comes with a very generous “forever” lifetime warranty that applies even if you bought the pedal secondhand. As well made as it is, though, it’s the sound and its unique place among fuzzes that will find you keeping it around long term.

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Tired of playing the same old dominant 7 chords during a blues? Let’s fix that.

Intermediate

Intermediate

  • Learn what chord substitutions are and how they work so that you can get more color out of your rhythm guitar playing.
  • Use extensions on dominant 7 chords as a way of creating new substitutions.
  • Play practical examples of substitutions within various blues grooves while maintaining the standard blues harmony.
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Staying creative and phrasing musically while playing chords, especially over a blues progression, seems like an impossibility to many players. After all, most blues songs contain only three chords, the I, IV, and V. So how can you make those simple chords more interesting? The answer is by using chord substitution.

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