The Tele and Precision Bass celebrate 60 years, while the Road Worn series gets hotter pickups and a smoother fretboard.

Scottsdale, AZ (November 4, 2010) – Fender will celebrate the 60th Anniversary of two of its most iconic instruments, as well as showcase several fun, innovative and affordable new products during the 2011 Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, Calif. from Jan. 13 – 16, 2011. Featured products include:



60th Anniversary Telecaster/Precision Bass
Officially named the Telecaster in February 1951, the world’s first successful solid-body electric guitar turns 60. It revolutionized guitar playing, changed the sound of music and became a signature instrument for guitarists worldwide. The 60th Anniversary Telecaster packs more than half a century of classic sound and design into one collectible U.S.-made instrument.

When it was introduced in 1951, Fender’s revolutionary Precision Bass guitar liberated musicians from the unwieldy confines of the upright bass, quickly becoming the preferred worldwide standard for tone, power and excellence. The Precision Bass has been booming ever since—six decades later, it’s still liberating musicians, still the worldwide standard and still the first word in electric bass.



Road Worn Player Series
The popular Road Worn series instruments struck a chord with guitarists with their aged, well-played look and feel and their incredible value. New Road Worn Player series guitars take the experience a step further with modern player-centric modifications including hotter pickups for smoldering, gritty tone and a flatter fingerboard for smooth, effortless bends. Lightly aged with care, Road Worn Player guitars feel immediately comfortable and familiar, offering endless miles of musical inspiration.

Fender will also be displaying their recently released Blacktop Series guitars and Mustang Series amps.

For more information:
Fender

Source: Press Release

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