GALLERY: Vintage Electro-Harmonix Pedals

Russian Big Muff Pi Bubble Font circa 1995

Photo by Kit Rae

A selection of vintage EHX pedals that still inspire today.

Travel back in time to see the crazy colors that Mike Matthews and his N.Y.C.-based crew have concocted the last 40-plus years.


1969/1970 Original Big Muff Pi

Photo by Kit Rae

Late-'70s Echo Flanger

Photo by Tom Hughes

1973 Big Muff Pi Version 2, Ram's Head

Photo by Kit Rae

Mike Matthews Soul Kiss

Photos by Tom Hughes

An early-90s Mike Matthews-branded Soul Kiss wah-type effect. It features a plastic case with a strap clip and is controlled with the mouthpiece coiled next to it.

Original Memory Man

Photo by Bart, effectsdatabase.com

Late '70s Muff Fuzz

Photo by Tom Hughes

NYC Big Muff Pi

Photo by Tom Hughes

1970s Little Big Muff

Photo courtesy stillnovo.com

Late '70s Polyphase

Photo by Tom Hughes

Late '70s Deluxe Electric Mistress

Photo by Tom Hughes

Small Stone Family

Photo courtesy pedalarea.com

The top row of this Small Stone collection shows left to right) a mid-'70s model with minimalist graphics, a late-'70s version with large orange lettering, early-'80s and mid-'90s models with blocky black-and-orange graphics, and a recent Small Stone Nano, while the bottom row features three Electro-Harmonix/Sovtek co-branded units built in Russia and a US-made late-'70s Bad Stone.

1975 Little Muff Pi

Photo courtesy stillnovo.com

[Updated 11/22/21]

Kemper Profiler Stage, Nueral DSP Quad Cortex & Line 6 HX Stomp (clockwise from top)

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