Line 6''s next generation of Variax modeling guitars are designed by James Tyler and will be available in three styles.

Frankfurt, Germany (March 24, 2010) – Line 6 announced today the next generation of Variax modeling guitars: Variax Designed by James Tyler. This new line of guitars, teased in our Go Ahead and Ask feature in the April issue of Premier Guitar, is designed to deliver the feel of the finest boutique instruments and the optimal tonal performance of Line 6 guitar modeling technology.

Through patented Line 6 guitar modeling technology, Variax guitars can reproduce the sounds of an entire collection of 25 vintage electric and acoustic instruments, and a dozen custom tunings. The modeled instruments include solid-body, semi-hollow guitars and hollow-body electrics with a variety of pickup configurations, six- and twelve-string acoustics, and other guitar-related instruments including a resonator, banjo, and an electric sitar.

This new line of guitars will be available in three styles. Each one reflects the innovative designs of James Tyler in each curve, component and control. Acclaimed for his attention to detail in making custom, hand-crafted instruments for the most discerning players, James Tyler has designed guitars for the world’s most respected guitarists and sought-after session players including Steve Lukather, Michael Landau and Dan Huff.






In a launch as creative as the instruments are innovative, Line 6 will be chronicling in real-time the design and development of the new guitars. At TylerVariax.com, the public is invited to participate firsthand in the evolution of these groundbreaking instruments.

Each Variax Designed by James Tyler will ship Summer, 2010.

For more information:
TylerVariax.com
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