Electro-Harmonix Unveils the STRING9

The latest in EHX's 9 Series is designed to turn guitar tone into a string ensemble synthesizer.


The Electro-Harmonix STRING9 String Ensemble is designed to transform guitar tone into nine different orchestral and string synth sounds and requires no special pickups, MIDI or instrument modifications. Using the same technology powering all EHX 9 Series pedals, the STRING9 creates fully polyphonic tones that pay tribute to some of the most iconic string synthesizers, and now features EHX’s signature Freeze effect on 3 of the presets.

Features

  • Symphonic: Recreates the sound of a large symphony orchestra and features an octave down effect on the lower range of the guitar
  • June-O: Emulates the Juno analog string synthesizer sound
  • PCM: Sound of a small studio string section sampled by a vintage PCM keyboard
  • Floppy: Emulates sound of an Orchestronoptical disc playback sampler
  • AARP: Emulates the classic ARP Solina string synthesizer
  • Crewman: Emulates the Crumar Performer analog string and brass synthesizer
  • Orch Freeze: Orchestral sound with a Freeze effect
  • Synth Freeze: String Synthesizer sound with a Freeze effect
  • VOX Freeze: Mellotron choir and strings sound with a Freeze Effect

Electro-Harmonix STRING9 String Ensemble (EHX Pedal Demo Bill Ruppert)

The STRING9 String Ensemble comes equipped with an EHX 9V power supply, is available now and features a US Street Price of $259.50. More info at www.ehx.com.


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