fender j mascis telecaster

Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) today announces the global launch of the J Mascis Telecaster, Mascis's second Fender Artist Signature guitar, joining his Signature Squier Jazzmaster. Sticking to his unique style, Fender worked closely with Mascis to recreate his infamous original 1958 top-Loader Tele guitar, the main axe he used in the mid-90s when he wrote some of his most iconic songs and lead work throughout his career.


"It means so much to be working with Fender," said J Mascis. "Already, the Tele® represents three decades of leads that I've recorded with this guitar. It's been my go-to for recording leads since I got it. It feels amazing to have a signature guitar. It's not something I ever imagined, but I'm truly honored."

J Mascis' penchant for running Fender guitars into stacks of amps to create massive fuzzy riffs, incendiary leads and huge hooks have made him an alt-rock icon. While primarily known as a Jazzmaster player, Mascis's Tele® is one of his favorite instruments in his collection. Growing up in Amherst, Massachusetts he became a drummer at age nine and pivoted to guitar when he founded Dinosaur Jr. in 1984. The band went on to help create alt rock as we know it, releasing dozens of hits including "Start Choppin," which was recorded with Mascis's original '58 Top-Loader Tele. "I find I play leads that are more interesting to me when I pick it up,'' added Mascis. "Even if I try another guitar, I usually end up liking what I played better on this guitar. I improvise all my leads when recording and my best stuff comes out of this guitar."

Exploring the J Mascis Telecaster | Artist Signature Series | Fender

The dazzling Bottle Rocket Blue Flake finish pulls inspiration from Mascis' old drum set dating back to his early days. Uniquely made for Mascis' playing style, the custom J Mascis Telecaster pickups are voiced to replicate the sound of the original 1958 Telecaster® pickups in Mascis's guitar; these single-coil Tele pickups have a classic vintage tone. Additionally, the Tele is made with a Top-Loader Telecaster® Bridge. A unique bridge type originally introduced in the late 50s, this top-load bridge offers reduced string tension and a shallower break angle compared to the traditional string-through bridges for a slinkier feel. Finally, the "C" neck with 9.5" radius and jumbo frets recreates the feel of J's original Tele, while the 9.5" radius fingerboard and jumbo frets provide easy playability and effortless bends.

J Mascis and Dinosaur Jr | Fender Signature Sessions | Fender

"We're honored to have had the opportunity to partner again with J Mascis, this time to recreate one of his favorite guitars," said Justin Norvell, EVP of Fender Products. "From the Bottle Rocket Blue Flake finish to the mirrored chrome pickguard, the top-load bridge to the Road Worn maple neck, this guitar is a celebration of the J Mascis sound that helped define alternative rock."

For more information:
Fender

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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