Gibson Announces the B.B. King Lucille Legacy

In honor of the legendary B.B. King, the Gibson Custom Shop launches the B.B. King Lucille Legacy, based on his personal and most well-known guitar.


The Gibson B.B. King Lucille Legacy features standout appointments including split block inlays, gold hardware, with a gold “B.B. King” engraved truss rod cover, and a TP-6 tailpiece with fine tuners. A “Lucille” mother of pearl inlay adorns the headstock, and the ebony fretboard features split block mother of pearl inlays. A mono Varitone switch, along with four audio taper CTS potentiometers and paper-in-oil Bumblebee capacitors, are paired to Gibson Custombucker humbucking pickups. The hollow-body design remains, but the f-Holes are gone, in keeping with B.B. King’s personal preferences. The top, back and sides of the body of the guitar feature figured maple veneer, which is visible through the Transparent Ebony finish.

“We are honored to celebrate the life and spirit of B.B. King with this very special addition to Gibson Custom Shop’s Artist Collection,” says Mat Koehler, Senior Director of Product Development, Gibson Brands. “The Lucille Legacy model features both classic Lucille features and some new ornate elements like split block inlays and a stunning figured maple body. Its beauty and character pay tribute to the man who brought joy to millions around the globe and created music so powerful it will live forever.”

B.B. King Lucille Legacy

Spending his life sharing the music of his soul, the man born Riley B. King would grow up to be one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, being crowned “The King of the Blues.” Releasing over 50 albums and 2400 master recordings along the way, The King of The Blues, gathered up other musicians in his wake and melded them into the harmony of his animating passion. As a 15-time GRAMMY Award Winner and the recipient of “The Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award,” the King’s global audience continues to expand worldwide and reaches over 90 million average yearly streams.

The B.B. King Lucille Legacy was crafted for fans to experience worldwide at authorized Gibson dealers and on www.gibson.com.

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