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Keeley Electronics Unveils the Parallax Spatial Generator

Keeley Electronics Unveils the Parallax Spatial Generator

When both sides are paired together, the Parallax offers the perfect end-of-pedalboard solution for Shoegaze, Ambient, and Experimental tone seekers.


The Parallax offers the delay side of the legendary Caverns paired with unique Shoegaze inspired reverbs of the Realizer in one pedalboard-friendly enclosure. On one side of the Parallax, analog-style modulated delays create a soft bed of warm repeats, while the other side builds Reverse setting-vibrato swirls (great for those who don’t have a vibrato arm on their guitar) to ambient modulations to form perfect pools of reverb reflection. When both sides are paired together, the Parallax offers the perfect end-of-pedalboard solution for Shoegaze, Ambient, and Experimental tone seekers.

Parallax Reverb Modes:

Soft Focus – A lush, surreal recreation of the popular Soft Focus patch from the Yamaha FX500multi effects processor, a late 80’s rack unit that was used to achieve many signature delay and modulation effects used in the early 90s. Adjusting the DECAY control changes both decay time of the reverb and feedback for the dual delay. DEPTH controls the depth of all 4 chorus voices.

Reverse (Reverse Reverb) – Inspired by the two most popular rack mount reverb effects of the ’80s and ’90s, the Yamaga SPX90 and the Alesis Midiverb II. DECAY switches between 8 different fixed delay times from a quick 150ms all the way up to a half second.No tremolo bar, no problem! Reverse mode also features an envelope-triggered vibrato that emulates the pitch bend from a Jazzmaster tremolo bar. Changing the DEPTH control will set how deep the ‘term bar’ is pushed. The WARMTH control in this mode is designed to work like the Jazzmaster rhythm pickup tone control.

Hall (Hall Reverb with Ascending Shimmer) – Hall reverb with an octave up. The output of the reverb is fed into an octave up which then feeds back into the input of the reverb, creating an infinitely ascending octave feedback loop. The DEPTH control will change how noticeable this pitch effect is.

The Delay side of the Parallax offers three-way switchable modulation that gives you access to even more analog textures. These carefully voiced echoes sit well in the mix whether clean or paired with your favorite drive or fuzz.

Parallax Delay Modulation Modes:

Off – No modulation, classic analog-style warm delay.

Deep – Heavy, swirling modulation added to the delay trail.

Light – Softer, gentle modulation added to the delay trail.

Use the Rate, Blend, and Repeats knobs in conjunction with the mode switch to unlock the full palette of Delay sounds in the Parallax.

Street price is $219.

For more information, please visit robertkeeley.com.

Keeley Electronics Parallax Spatial Generator Reverb and Delay Pedal - Technical Demo


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