Mesa/Boogie Announces the Subway D-350 Bass Amp

Building on the foundation of the Subway D-800, the D-350 is the lightest bass amp in Mesa/Boogie history and packs 350 watts of power.


The new Subway D-350 uses a solid-state preamp coupled with a lightweight Class D power amp and switch-mode power supply to deliver world-class tone in an incredibly small and lightweight package that’s designed for home use and studio recording sessions while delivering plenty of power and punch to provide MESA-quality tone for small to mid-sized venues, or as a micro-sized backup amp on tour.

The MESA Subway D-350 adapts for use with active or passive basses with the flip of the Active/Passive switch, while the Input Mute switch lets you use inline tuners silently. The Bright switch adds bite and sparkle to the tone and opens up the top end a bit more, and all the switches have LED status indicators. Separate Gain and Master Volume controls allow you to dial up a wide range of tones from shimmering clean to mild overdrive and everything in between, while the built-in fixed high-pass filter (HPF) blocks unwanted, non-musical, headroom-robbing sub-sonic frequencies. The Variable Voicing control adjusts the amp’s response from a flatter curve to a more vintage curve by modifying and varying levels and frequency response in multiple regions with the turn of a single knob.

Subway D-350

MESA/Boogie Subway D-350

MESA/Boogie's Subway D-350 Bass Amp, available worldwide at authorized MESA/Boogie dealers and on www.MESABoogie.com. $699.00 USD.

A compact pedal format preamp designed to offer classic, natural bass tone with increased tonal control and extended headroom.

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Fig. 1

Here’s a different way to unleash the beast within your tracks.

Welcome to another Dojo. Last month I explained in detail how to set up and use sidechain compression techniques to get that classic pop/EDM pumping sound on your rhythm guitar parts and other instruments in your mix. This time, we’ll use the same setup techniques but, instead of sidechaining a compressor, I’m going to show you the benefits of using a gate.

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In high cotton: Charlie Musselwhite is thoroughly content with his return to the Delta. “We love living here,” he says. “It just makes sense, and it feels like the blues is alive and well in the Delta and you can just feel it rising up from the earth, it’s so present.”

Photo by Rory Doyle

On his new album, Mississippi Son, the harmonica giant steps out on guitar, evoking the legends of country blues 6-string and earning his place among them.

For Charlie Musselwhite, the blues isn’t just a style of music. It’s a sacrament. And Musselwhite is one of its high priests. With a palmful of bent notes on the harmonica—the instrument on which he’s been an acknowledged master for more than a half-century—or the fat snap of a guitar string, he has the power to summon not only the blues’ great spirits, but the places they rose from. If you listen closely, you can envision the Mississippi Delta’s plantation lands, where the summer sun forms a shimmering belt on the low horizon and even a slight breeze can paint your face red with clay dust. It’s a place both old and eternal—full of mystery and history and magic. And the music from that place, as Musselwhite sings in his new song “Blues Gave Me a Ride,” “tells the truth in a world full of lies.”

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