Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Strymon Announces New BigSky Reverb Plugin

Strymon Announces New BigSky Reverb Plugin

A software recreation of Strymon's best-selling BigSky hardware reverb.


The plugin features 12 custom reverb algorithms, with traditional physical spaces like rooms and halls joining unique filtered and pitched ambient machines. With Infinite hold/Freezefunctionality, jaw-dropping sound quality, and industry-leading flexibility, the new BigSky plugin offers DAW users a powerful new tool for creating ambient textures.

Multidimensional Reverb Plugin: The new BigSky plugin from Strymon is a direct port of Strymon's best-selling hardware pedal, bringing all of the functionality, uniqueness, and pristine sound quality of the original to your favorite DAW. Now you can use as many instances of Big Sky in your session as you’d like, using it to add simple Room ambiance to a drum kit while wholly transforming a string pad with the Shimmer or Chorale machines. With 12 custom-tuned reverb algorithms that cover everything from traditional acoustic spaces to wildly creative ambient machines, Infinite/Freeze functionality, and a dynamically simple user interface, the BigSky plugin is destined to become your new secret weapon in the studio.

Product Highlights:

  • 12 custom-tuned reverb algorithms, perfect for a variety of sound sources.
  • Traditional high-resolution algorithms like Rooms, Halls, Plates, and Springs.
  • Entirely new and transformative reverb machines featuring pitch shifting, filtering, tunable room ambiance, and more.
  • Easily add modulation to any reverb machine.
  • Infinite and Freeze functionality with Hold, to create undulating soundscapes.
  • Easy-to-use dynamic interface puts every parameter right where you need it, so dialing in killer sounds is quick and easy.
  • Resizable user interface with four sizes to choose from (and big is BIG).​

Strymon BigSky Plugin - Acoustic Performance

The new BigSky plugin comes in AAX, AU, and VST3 formats, and is available directly from Strymon and at select retailers worldwide, for $199 US. For more information, please visit strymon.net.

The Return of Johnny Cash—John Carter Cash Interview
The Return of Johnny Cash—John Carter Cash Interview on Johnny’s New Songwriter Album

The Man in Black returns with the unreleased Songwriter album. John Carter Cash tells us the story.

Read MoreShow less


Read MoreShow less

Gibson’s Theodore model

PRS Guitars and Ted McCarty family drop “Theodore” trademark objection, and Gibson agrees to drop opposition to PRS’s “594” and “Silver Sky Nebula” trademarks and trademark applications.

PRS Guitars yesterday announced that it has withdrawn its objection to Gibson’s registration of the “Theodore” trademark. In a press release, PRS stated it continues to hold dear and protect its long-standing agreement with Ted McCarty and the McCarty family regarding the exclusive rights to the “McCarty” trademark and to McCarty’s name and persona, first developed directly with Ted himself more than 25 years ago. After a series of private negotiations, Gibson has also agreed to drop its opposition to PRS’s “594” and “Silver Sky Nebula” trademarks and trademark applications.

Read MoreShow less

A technicolor swirl of distortion, drive, boost, and ferocious fuzz.

Summons a wealth of engaging, and often unique, boost, drive, distortion, and fuzz tones that deviate from common templates. Interactive controls.

Finding just-right tones, while rewarding, might demand patience from less assured and experienced drive-pedal users. Tone control could be more nuanced.

$199

Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

4.5
4
4
4.5

The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

Read MoreShow less