IMPROVE YOUR DIGITAL RESULTS WITH UTM CODES

One of the best ways to make sure you're receiving traffic from your online campaigns is by using UTM tracking codes on your final URL. 
Let's break down why this is important:
First, it allows you to examine multiple attribution sources to a single link. For example, if you're running a promotion with PG as well as on other online platforms, a separate UTM code for each source will let you know which sources are driving the most traffic to your site. 
Second, UTM codes make sure that the attribution of that traffic is correct. For example, if you're not seeing results in Google Analytics from a specific campaign or initiative, adding a UTM code to your destination URL insures that all of that traffic will be cataloged correctly by GA for you. You can measure and identify the best sources of your web site traffic.
Yes, you can find an approximation of these numbers using standard Google Analytics tracking, but as you may have noticed in some of your previous campaigns, not all traffic is going to be attributable -- some traffic may show up as undefined. Using a UTM code allows you to insure you're seeing all of the traffic from a specific source. 
Here's a really cool explanation of UTM codes using Star Wars that helps to drive this point home.
IT'S EASY TO GET STARTED. REALLY.
So, how do you put this awesome free tool to use for you? Google has a Campaign URL Builder that spits out a fully formed UTM code with all the source info you'll need. Simply fill in the fields, copy the final URL (with UTM info included) and send that as your terminal link instead, along with any ad assets that you'd normally send.
That's all it takes!
A REAL-WORLD EXAMPLE

In PG's case, let's say we were running a sponsored post or ad on Facebook to drive traffic to one pedal giveaways. The normal terminal link would be https://www.premierguitar.com/blogs/4-win-stuff/post/26232-pedalmania-2017-week-1
Well, we want to know specifically how much traffic to that page came from Facebook. If we were to follow this traffic through the Behavior tab of Google Analytics (GA > Behavior > All Traffic) we'd find the number of visits to that page, but with no attribution.
On the other hand, if we used Google's Campaign URL tool, the new terminal link would be https://www.premierguitar.com/blogs/4-win-stuff/post/26232-pedalmania-2017-week-1?utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=Pedalmania_Week1
You can see from examining the URL that our original terminal link is included, while the UTM code also incorporates the source of the traffic (Facebook) as well as our campaign name (Pedalmania_Week1). 
If we want to check how much traffic we're getting from Facebook, all we need to do is check GA> Acquisition > Campaigns > All Campaigns to see exactly how much traffic FOR THIS SPECIFIC PROMOTION is coming from Facebook.
Yes, we can look at GA> Acquisition > Social > Facebook and search, but using UTM code segments the campaign on its own, allowing you to know you have correct attribution to your campaign.
UTM codes are a great way to keep track of your digital marketing campaigns so that you can get the data you need to make smart business decisions based on what's working! Contact your PG Sales Rep for more digital advertising insights.

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lunastonepedals.com

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rjmmusic.com

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solidgoldfx.com

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acornamps.com

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