Peavey offers free upgrade for ReValver MKIII users

Meridian, MS (May 19, 2009) -- The highly anticipated RTAS release of ReValver MKIII is available now as a free download at Peavey.com for licensed users of the acclaimed virtual amplifier software. Developed by veteran tube-amp maker Peavey Electronics, ReValver Mk III is a revolutionary 64-bit amplifier modeling software that captures the true characteristics of vacuum tubes while allowing users unprecedented control over their tonality and gain structures. Consumers who have purchased ReValver MKIII can download the RTAS upgrade now at www.peavey.com/products/revalver.

Readers of Guitar Player magazine voted ReValver Mk III amplifier-modeling software as the Best Home Studio Gear of 2009 in its annual Readers’ Choice Awards. The software also won a Premier Gear Award from Premier Guitar magazine and Platinum and Value Awards from Future Music magazine. "ReValver’s amp models might be the ones that make you leave the real thing at home, wrote Michael Ross in the June 2008 issue of Guitar Player. "At times, I forgot I was playing through software.” In his EQ magazine critique, he added, "In terms of sounding and feeling like a real amp, ReValver is easily the best software I’ve tried. I will stack ReValver against any other software, and more than a few boutique amps."

ReValver Mk III models 15 of the world’s most popular guitar amplifiers, including several Peavey amps, through an exclusive algorithm that analyzes the interactions of the components at the circuit level, based on the amps’ original schematics. By controlling these amplifier models from the component level, ReValver is able to model every nuance with amazing accuracy, allowing serious players to design their ultimate custom amps and speaker systems.

As advanced as ReValver’s modeling algorithms are, operating the models can be as simple or in-depth as the user desires. The software GUI is instantly familiar and easy to use, with a drag-and-drop interface where users can add and subtract individual components and devices such as amplifiers, preamps, power amps, stomp boxes and effects.

Unlocking ReValver’s groundbreaking customization tools is also easy. By right-clicking on an amp model, users can “go inside” and adjust the amp’s tones and components on the Tweak Module GUI. This allows users to change, add or subtract tubes on all amplifier models, and then calibrate even the voltage parameters of those tubes. In all, users can program more than 15 elements and functions on each tube stage, with as many as 17 different preamp and power tube types to choose from.

ReValver Mk III also features a robust stomp-box and effects section including various types of chorus, distortion, wah, tremolo, compression, limiter, delay, octaver and much more. A new FFT-based convolution reverb allows for very complex and smooth reverbs, including sampled spring reverb, and allows users to import their own .WAV samples. Models of Peavey 6505, JSX, Classic, ValveKing and Triple XXX guitar amps are available in ReValver in software format.

System Requirements:
1 GHz CPU, 512 MB RAM
1024 x 768 screen resolution
Windows: Stand alone, VST host, RTAS host or ASIO/WDM sound card
Mac: Stand alone, VST/AU host, RTAS host or sound card

For more information:
Peavey

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