humbucker equipped

Rev recasts its classic offset with a rocking pickup complement that can play it cool or bring the attitude.

Very good build quality. Versatile sonic capabilities from a clever pickup and control complement.

Slightly rough fret ends in a few spots.

$1,099

Reverend Six Gun HPP
reverendguitars.com

4
4.5
4.5
4.5

The silhouette of the new Six Gun HPP is, at this point, a familiar shape—and arguably a classic. It's the foundation for many different Reverend models and clearly a versatile platform for evolution and experimentation. The updated pickup configuration and other new features of Reverend's offset workhorse make the $1,099 Korea-built Six Gun an impressive performer for the price.

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Breaking with style dogma delivers new sonic, ergonomic, and aesthetic joys. The PG Fano Omnis GF6 review.

 

Ratings

Pros:
Excellent quality and attention to detail. Suprisingly airy humbuckers. Neck feels great. Compound fretboard radius.

Cons:
A touch expensive. Two-control layout is limiting.

Street:
$999

Fano Omnis GF6
fanoguitars.com


Tones:


Playability:


Build/Design:


Value:
 
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Image 1 — How to Get the Most out of Hum-Sing-Hum Wiring

Schematic courtesy of singlecoil.com

This circuit lets you get HSH and SSS-like tones from a single guitar.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. Today we'll talk about HSH wiring in general and how to get the best out of it. In general, an HSH configuration means that you have three pickups on your guitar: a bridge humbucker, a middle single-coil, and a neck humbucker. This configuration was very popular in the so-called “super-strat" era, but is still used today, even if you don't see it as often. Almost every manufacturer has at least one or more HSH models in its portfolio, from Ibanez to Suhr, Charvel, Fender, and PRS to Framus, just to name a few. So, I think it's worth taking a closer look at this special configuration, its possibilities, and its downsides.

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