november 2008

Sweep Picking

Sweep picking is a popular technique among shred guitarists and it is used in many styles of music.

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This lesson I will be showing you examples to develop your sweep picking technique. Sweep picking is a popular technique among shred guitarists and it is used in many styles of music. It is a similar technique to raking. The tricky part of sweeping is getting the notes not to run together like a chord. I will be showing you some good ways to practice sweep picking and I will give you some musical examples.

Example 1
This first example is a two string G# minor arpeggio (G#, B, D#). This is a great way to develop your sweep picking, just using 2 strings. The right hand pick motion is just down, down, up continuously. Example 1a is the same arpeggio but we will be adding a pull off, this is a common way to play arpeggios.


Example 2
Let''s move on to three string arpeggios. Here we have a D major arpeggio (D, F#, A). This is a great one to practice, and is really useful. The right hand continues down, down, up. Make sure you are lifting off the left hand slightly after you hit each note so the notes don''t run together like a chord. Example 2a is great way to practice sweeping. We are moving the D major arpeggio up in half step intervals, the pinky and index finger is sliding up each time we move to the next arpeggio. Be sure you follow the suggested fingerings.


Examples 2b & 3
Example 2b is the same thing as the previous example, but now we are adding the 4th string. In example 3 we will add the 5th string to our D major arpeggio. This is a common shape and is fun to practice. In this example we are moving the five string arpeggio up in minor 3rd intervals. These examples are great for developing your sweep picking technique.


Example 4
Here is a A minor 5th string arpeggio (A, C, E). A cool way to add interest to your arpeggios is to change the top note. In this example we change the top note to a G, which gives us a Am7th arpeggio and by changing the top note to F# creates a Am6th arpeggio.

That wraps up the lesson, be sure to make up your own examples and for more info visit www.mikecampese.com.

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The Bass Metaphors is an all-purpose channel strip and distortion in one box made from lightweight aluminum.

Electro-Harmonix Bass Metaphors
Download example 1
Clean
Download example 2
Dirty
Recorded with US Masters EP41PJ straight into Nuendo
Electro Harmonix has recently released a number of dedicated bass offerings, including the Bass Metaphors. The Bass Metaphors is an all-purpose channel strip and distortion in one box made from lightweight aluminum. It features separate Gain controls for clean and distorted settings, as well as a two-band EQ with dedicated EQ level. There is also a blend knob for mixing the effected signal with your dry bass tone, and a mini toggle that switches on a preset compressor. The pedal has an XLR Direct out as well as dedicated 1/4” outputs for effected or non-effected signal.

The Metaphors was tested as a DI on a master session, with the tone controls and blend set at twelve o’clock. It immediately sounded warm and round with a Tobias Classic six-string. Notes over the entire tonal spectrum were thick, and the Metaphors handled the B string well. There was a bit of top end hiss at first, but it was controlled easily after rolling off some treble. Engaging the distortion yielded a great, tube-like grind that any rock bassists would enjoy. Adding the Metaphors compressor immediately tightened up the overdrive’s definition, making it more articulate. Switching back to clean with an NS Design electric upright offered a huge amount of growl fretless players will love.

Bassists are utilitarian by nature, and this box does it all. If you are into doing the job with one pedal in your gig bag this might just be it. – SS
Buy If...
you need an all-purpose DI with distortion.
Skip If...

you need a fully adjustable compressor.
Rating...
4.0
MSRP $158 - Electro Harmonix - ehx.com

This pedal was developed to achieve the powerful sustaining punchy sound of the Strat played by Mr. Gallagher, who used it with a Rangemaster.

BSM RG Treble Booster
This pedal was developed to achieve the powerful sustaining punchy sound of the Strat played by Mr. Gallagher, who used it with a Rangemaster. Most models replicating the Rangemaster are basically the same circuit with a few mods to make them sound a bit more like the settings used by certain artists. In this case, the BSM Rory Gallagher model has a knob on the side labeled “volume,” but I found it boosted the upper mids into a really nice singing sustain. The originals did not have this feature. What is great about it is that by altering the position of the midrange either Strats or humbuckers will sound great. This particular model pedal seems to have a little extra tightness in the low end. I liked the definition and growl on those low notes—they were never muddy. It is best used before a distorting amp or a pedal, as are the other straight ahead Rangemaster-type models. I don’t think I would use it in front of a real clean amp like the Fender Twin, as it was just not that pleasing of a tone for me.

The RG is a well-constructed unit, as are all the BSM pedals I’ve had the privilege to test. True bypass switching is in place here. This pedal works great for pretty much all types of rock music, older and modern. It primarily sounds best for lead guitar and solo work, but it does clean up when the volume is backed down for a nice crunchy rhythm tone. – KR
Buy If...
you’re after the most killer snarling Strat tone ever, or a really aggressive humbucker sound.
Skip If...

you’re looking for more of a Stevie Ray tone.
Rating...

MSRP $319.99 - BSM - treblebooster.net
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