PG's Rebecca Dirks is On Location in Anaheim, CA, for NAMM 2010 where she visits the Gretsch Guitars booth. In this segment, we get to check out their latest model from the Gretsch Custom Shop, the G6120EC Eddie Cochran Tribute Model. During his all-too brief life and career, Eddie Cochran (1938-1960) only ever owned and played one main electric guitar, an orange Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins hollow-body he bought brand-new in 1955 at age 16 from the Bell Gardens Music Center in his hometown, Bell Gardens, CA. The guitar bore the serial number 16942, and his parents helped him buy it. A sharp young guitarist who was particular about his sound and knowledgeable about guitar design and modification, Cochran hot-rodded his Gretsch with a warmer-sounding dog ear neck pickup. Virtually indistinguishable from the original, the Gretsch Custom Shop G6120EC Eddie Cochran Tribute model is authentic in every detail, from the aluminum nut and bridge to the famous dog ear neck pickup; from the distressed vintage orange nitrocellulose lacquer finish to the relic gold-plated hardware and Bigsby? B6GPVF vibrato tailpiece. Its features include a bound laminated maple body and arched top, a specially shaped three-piece maple/walnut/maple neck with a 22-fret 9-radius bound rosewood fingerboard, a Seymour Duncan? Dog Ear single-coil neck pickup, a Seymour Duncan? DynaSonic? single-coil bridge pickup, three-way switching, rosewood bridge base, vintage-style gold Gotoh? SE700-05M tuners, modified plexi pickguard, western block fingerboard inlays (depicting cactus, steer heads and fences), lower body bout G brand, and pearloid steer head/Gretsch logo inlay on the bound headstock.



PG's Rebecca Dirks is On Location in Anaheim, CA, for NAMM 2010 where she visits the Gretsch Guitars booth. In this segment, we get to check out their latest model from the Gretsch Custom Shop, the G6120EC Eddie Cochran Tribute Model.

During his all-too brief life and career, Eddie Cochran (1938-1960) only ever owned and played one main electric guitar, an orange Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins hollow-body he bought brand-new in 1955 at age 16 from the Bell Gardens Music Center in his hometown, Bell Gardens, CA. The guitar bore the serial number 16942, and his parents helped him buy it. A sharp young guitarist who was particular about his sound and knowledgeable about guitar design and modification, Cochran hot-rodded his Gretsch with a warmer-sounding dog ear neck pickup.

Virtually indistinguishable from the original, the Gretsch Custom Shop G6120EC Eddie Cochran Tribute model is authentic in every detail, from the aluminum nut and bridge to the famous dog ear neck pickup; from the distressed vintage orange nitrocellulose lacquer finish to the relic gold-plated hardware and Bigsby? B6GPVF vibrato tailpiece.

Its features include a bound laminated maple body and arched top, a specially shaped three-piece maple/walnut/maple neck with a 22-fret 9-radius bound rosewood fingerboard, a Seymour Duncan? Dog Ear single-coil neck pickup, a Seymour Duncan? DynaSonic? single-coil bridge pickup, three-way switching, rosewood bridge base, vintage-style gold Gotoh? SE700-05M tuners, modified plexi pickguard, western block fingerboard inlays (depicting cactus, steer heads and fences), lower body bout G brand, and pearloid steer head/Gretsch logo inlay on the bound headstock.

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Photo by Chad Kelco

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Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

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