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Rig Rundown - Anthrax's Scott Ian and Rob Caggiano

PG's Rebecca Dirks is on location at the Vic Theatre in Chicago, IL, where she catches up with Anthrax guitarists Scott Ian and Rob Caggiano. In these segments, the guys walk us through their live rigs.

Presented by:
and

PG's Rebecca Dirks is on location at the Vic Theatre in Chicago, IL, where she catches up with Anthrax guitarists Scott Ian and Rob Caggiano. In these segments, the guys walk us through their live rigs.



Presented by:
and

Guitars
Scott's main guitar for most of the show is his signature Jackson. This one is customized with his son's name inlayed on the neck. He uses custom .011 - 52 D'Addario strings and tunes down a half-step. He only uses the bridge pickup, but prefers the tone of the two-pickup models. Other guitars in the lineup include this parts guitar Scott lost track of this in the late '80s, and came across the body for sale on eBay recently. He had Fender put it back together with a Strat neck (EVH profile).

The third guitar pictured is a custom McSwain zombie guitar was built with wood from a church at the cemetery "Night of the Living Dead" was shot at. To add to the creep factor, the wood was buried in the cemetery for a month, the ribcage is a prop from The Walking Dead television show, and the side dots on the fretboard are old coffin nails.

Scott also uses a single-pickup version of his signature model, and various custom-painted versions.

Rob uses his signature ESP guitar, completely stock, and travels with just one backup.

Amps
Scott Ian uses his Randall signature modular amp, which is no longer in production. It has three modular channels which he cutsom designed. Channel 1 is his "clean" channel and is nicknamed "Malcom" for its AC/DC-style tone, Channel 2 is called "1987" and is modeled after his '80s JCM800s, and Channel 3 is nicknamed "Nuts" and is a modern gain channel that he kicks in sometimes for feedback at the end of a song.


Rob uses a Fryette Sig X head (with one for backup) running through two matching Fryette 412 cabinets.

Pedals
Scott uses minimal effects, employing the MXR Carbon Copy Delay, MXR EVH Phase 90, and TC Electronic Corona chorus for specific song parts. The CAE Boost/Overdrive and MXR Smart Gate are always on. In the back of the drawer are two additional MXR Smart Gates which are currently out of the loop. The effects are controlled with a Voodoo Lab Ground Control, launched by his guitar tech. On the floor, he uses a Dunlop CAE wah and a DigiTech Whammy that he just uses occasionally for fun.

Rob uses more effects than Scott, usually employing his Death by Audio Interstellar Overdriver Deluxe or the Devi Ever 90 Fuzz for dirt. He uses the MXR Custom Comp for solos and the MXR EVH Phase 90 and Micro Chorus come in for specific songs. The Boss DD-5 is set up with tap tempo, and the Tech 21 Boost R.V.B is a new addition to his board. The pedals are controlled through a Musicom EFX MK III switcher.

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