PG's Rebecca Dirks is On Location in Chicago, IL, at the House of Blues where she catches up with guitarist Yngwie Malmsteen who walks us through his touring rig that he used during the Relentless 2011 tour.

PG's Rebecca Dirks is On Location in Chicago, IL, at the House of Blues where she catches up with guitarist Yngwie Malmsteen who walks us through his touring rig that he used during the Relentless 2011 tour.

Guitars
Ygnwie uses his Yngwie Malmsteen Signature Strats with a large headstock, Seymour Duncan YJM Fury pickups, scalloped fretboard with Dunlop frets, brass nut, standard tremolo, and 250K YJM pots, as well as one more important detail: "You have to have the Ferrari sticker on the back, otherwise it won't work." He tunes one Strat down, and uses a red version for the song, "Red Devil." The guitars are strung with Fender .008 - .048 strings.

For acoustic songs, Malmsteen uses his well-worn nylon-string Ovation Viper customized with different soundholes and large frets.

Amps
Yngwie's legendary wall of Marshalls features 36 heads and 22 cabinets. The wall is composed of vintage Marshall heads and cabinets, but his live amps and cabs are from his new Marshall YJM series. The YJM100 cabinets are loaded with Celestion 75-watt speakers. He runs one of his YJM heads at 50 watts and one at 100 watts. Though the amp has attenuation, noise gate, overdrive, and digital reverb, Malmsteen says he doesn't use those features live.

Effects
For pedals, Malmsteen uses a Boss NS-2 Noise Supressor and a Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble for clean sounds.

He also uses a vintage Roland Analog Echo, "to make noise," a Cry Baby wah, Taurus bass pedals (not pictured), and a DOD Yngwie Malmsteen YJM308 Preamp Overdrive.

He uses an RJM Mastermind MIDI Foot Controller to split the signal for stereo sound and to control the effects. The Fuzz Face to the left of the controller is not in use, he says, he just likes the way it looks ("like a landmine.") His picks are 1.5mm Dunlop.

Equipped with noise reduction and noise gate modes, the Integrated Gate has a signal monitoring function that constantly monitors the input signal.

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Luthier Maegen Wells recalls the moment she fell in love with the archtop and how it changed her world.

The archtop guitar is one of the greatest loves of my life, and over time it’s become clear that our tale is perhaps an unlikely one. I showed up late to the archtop party, and it took a while to realize our pairing was atypical. I had no idea that I had fallen head-over-heels in love with everything about what’s commonly perceived as a “jazz guitar.” No clue whatsoever. And, to be honest, I kind of miss those days. But one can only hear the question, “Why do you want to build jazz guitars if you don’t play jazz?” so many times before starting to wonder what the hell everyone’s talking about.

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A modern take on Fullerton shapes and a blend of Fender and Gibson attributes strikes a sweet middle ground.

A stylish alternative to classic Fender profiles that delivers sonic versatility. Great playability.

Split-coil sounds are a little on the thin side. Be sure to place it on the stand carefully!

$1,149

Fender Player Plus Meteora HH
fender.com

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After many decades of sticking with flagship body shapes, Fender spent the last several years getting more playful via their Parallel Universe collection. The Meteora, however, is one of the more significant departures from those vintage profiles. The offset, more-angular profile was created by Fender designer Josh Hurst and first saw light of day as part of the Parallel Universe Collection in 2018. Since then, it has headed in both upscale and affordable directions within the Fender lineup—reaching the heights of master-built Custom Shop quality in the hands of Ron Thorn, and now in this much more egalitarian guise as the Player Plus Meteora HH.

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