The G5034TFT Rancher has an iso-chamber mounted Fideli'Tron pickup with a Bigsy B70G tailpiece.

G5022CWFE-12 Rancher Falcon Jumbo

Scottsdale, AZ (January 24, 2014) -- Gretsch Rancher acoustics are back and better than ever for 2014 with five new-and-improved models suitable for acoustic players of all tastes.

The G5022CWFE Rancher Falcon Jumbo gives players full-on Gretsch Falcon style, sparkling gilded appointments and onboard electronics for peerless amplified tone. Its jumbo cutaway body is finished in gloss white with dazzling gold-sparkle binding on the top, back, sound hole, fingerboard and headstock. Other premium features include a solid spruce top with scalloped “X” bracing and classic Rancher triangular sound hole, maple sides and arched back, mahogany neck, 21-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic™ “thumbnail” inlays, “V”-shaped headstock with vertical winged “Gretsch” sparkle logo, compensated bridge with rosewood base, deluxe tuners, gold-plated hardware, and Fishman® electronics. Also available with 12 strings as the G5022CWFE-12 Rancher Falcon Jumbo model.

The G5031FT Rancher dreadnought guitar is one of the more distinctive Rancher models, with a beautiful Sunburst gloss finish and a sweet iso-chamber mounted Fideli’Tron™ pickup for great amplified tone and performance. Other features include a bound solid spruce top with scalloped “X” bracing and the classic Rancher triangular sound hole (with binding), mahogany sides and bound arched back, mahogany neck, 16-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic™ “thumbnail” inlays, volume control, compensated bridge saddle with rosewood base, deluxe tuners, and gold-plated hardware.

Gretsch’s G5024E Rancher dreadnought is an eminently affordable model with a beautiful Sunburst gloss finish, fine construction and appointments, and onboard electronics for peerless amplified tone. Premium features include a bound solid spruce top with scalloped “X” bracing and the classic Rancher triangular sound hole (with binding), mahogany sides and bound arched back, mahogany neck, 21-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic “thumbnail” inlays, compensated bridge with rosewood base, deluxe tuners, gold-plated hardware, and Fishman electronics.

The G5034TFT Rancher is perhaps one of the most distinctive Rancher models ever created, with a beautiful Savannah Sunset gloss finish, a sweet iso-chamber mounted Fideli’Tron pickup for great amplified tone and performance, and even a Bigsby B70G tailpiece with a “wire” trem arm. Other premium features include an arched maple top and back with binding, maple sides, classic Rancher triangular sound hole with binding, mahogany neck, 16-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic “thumbnail” inlays, volume control, “rocking bar” bridge with rosewood base, deluxe tuners, and gold-plated hardware.

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Gretsch Guitars

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