The release CFM IV 1955 D-18 and the CFM IV 1955 D-18 commemorate the 55th birthday of Christian Frederick "Chris" Martin IV of Martin Guitar.

Nazareth, PA (June 21, 2010) -- Like the recent CFM IV 1955 D-28, the CFM IV 1955 D-18 commemorates the 55th birthday and ongoing contribution of Christian Frederick "Chris" Martin IV to the company that bears his name.

Since its introduction in 1935, the D-18 has been one of the major stalwarts of the Martin line, and for many years outsold the more costly D-28. In 1955, the year of Chris Martin's birth, Martin sold 1,103 D-18s versus 806 D-28s. Musicians including Elvis Presley, Hank Wiliams, and Eddie Cochran used a D-18.

In creating the CFM IV 1955 D-18, Martin replicated D-18 specs in place during 1955. This includes Sitka top with non-scalloped top braces, small maple bridgeplate, elegant old style 18 rosette and tortoise body binding & pickguard, cedar ribbons, cloth reinforcement strips, ebony bridge (with long bone saddle) and fingerboard, bone saddle, rounded headstock (from template wear) with old style C. F Martin & Co. scroll decal and other authentic 1955-specific details.

The guitar features quilted mahogany (dark stain), adjustable 14-fret neck (with two-way truss rod), old style "waffleback" tuners, figured Madagascar rosewood back strip and head plate veneer (similar in look to the original Brazilian rosewood headplate), and a small paper label specially designed by Dick Boak and signed by C.F. Martin IV in numbered sequence. The guitar is finished in premium high-gloss polished lacquer.

Only 55 of these superb instruments will be offered and delivered in our highest grade Cabernet plush, 5-ply, hard shell case.

For more information:
Martin Guitar

Source: Press Release

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