Neutrik powerCON TRUE1 Connector Debuts Stateside

Anaheim, CA (January 14, 2011) -- Neutrik USA announces the U.S. debut of its powerCON TRUE1 AC power connector at Winter NAMM 2011. The lockable, extremely robust system of

Anaheim, CA (January 14, 2011) -- Neutrik USA announces the U.S. debut of its powerCON TRUE1 AC power connector at Winter NAMM 2011. The lockable, extremely robust system of single-phase connectors is among the first of its kind to feature IEC 60320 breaking capacity, designed for 16 A, 250 V, making it ideal for concerts and similarly staged productions where the electrical equipment is often confined to a small area, making safety a top priority.

A complete system, including inlet and outlet couplers for easy daisy chaining of equipment, powerCON TRUE1 also provides for high-density requirements with a unique duplex chassis connector combining an inlet and outlet coupler. Performance crew workers and other production professionals can connect large amounts of electrical equipment without worrying that interruptions to the current will cause a catastrophic electric arc.

The new connector is available for self-termination or as a ready-made cord set. The cord set, with over-molded cable connectors, offers protection class IP65 in the mated condition. Neutrik’s Twist-Lock locking system prevents inadvertent disconnection.

The powerCON TRUE1 connector is the latest addition to Neutrik’s powerCON series of locking three-conductor equipment AC connectors, and the first to offer IEC 60320 breaking capacity. With contacts for line, neutral and pre-mating ground contact, the powerCON series replaces appliance couplers wherever a very rugged solution in combination with a locking device is needed in order to guarantee a safe power connection. In addition to PowerCON TRUE1, the line includes the PowerCON 20 A and 32 A models.

For more information:

Neutrik

Source: Press Release

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