C.F. Martin’s Chris Martin IV Assumes Executive Chairman Role As Company Appoints New CEO

After 35 years, Chris Martin IV steps down as CEO of C.F. Martin.

Chris Martin IV steps into new position of Executive Chairman and the company appoints Thomas Ripsam as CEO.

C.F. Martin & Co. announced today that Thomas Ripsam has been appointed the company's new Chief Executive Officer. Effective June 14, 2021, Mr. Ripsam succeeds longtime Chairman and CEO, Christian Frederick Martin IV, who assumes the role of Executive Chairman.

An experienced growth strategist and leader, Mr. Ripsam has a deep passion for companies with a strong heritage and legacy. He is a trusted advisor and business partner, having guided numerous boards of directors and leadership teams to shape strategies and deliver results. His expertise in strategy development, digital/technology deployment, and continuous improvement will ensure the continued growth of the 188-year-old company.

After 35 years as C.F. Martin & Co. CEO, Chris Martin is stepping into his new leadership role of Executive Chairman. During his time as CEO, Mr. Martin has guided the company through booms and crises, leaving a legacy of growth and manufacturing excellence. This transition comes as the company is experiencing unprecedented demand for its products.

"First, I want to thank everyone in the music products business for their support during my 35-year career as CEO of my family's business. What a ride!" said Mr. Martin. "I complete my term as NAMM Chairman this July at the show in Nashville, and I have been thinking about retiring for several years, so this felt like the right time. I look forward to transitioning to the role of Executive Chairman of Martin Guitar where I will continue to be a cheerleader for the Martin brand. I am excited to work with Thomas as he gets to know all of us and shares the love we all have for the guitar."

"I have admired Martin guitars since I was a teenager," says new CEO Ripsam.

Chris Martin hands the reins to Mr. Ripsam, who, over the course of his 25+ year career, first at Booz Allen & Hamilton, and most recently as a partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers, took on leadership responsibilities for growing the business, developing service offerings and managing teams. He has worked with consumer goods companies, specialty retailers, technology solutions providers, Fortune 50 companies, and family-owned businesses, helping to drive profitable growth, enhancing digital capabilities, improving customer experience and engagement, and generating hundreds of millions in incremental value for his clients.

An avid guitar player, Mr. Ripsam collects fretted instruments and even took a sabbatical in 2019 to work with a luthier to learn about the process of building acoustic guitars – in the style of Martin. He holds an MBA in Strategy & Finance from Columbia Business School and a BA in Business Administration and Management from Reutlingen University in Germany and Middlesex University in London.

"I have admired Martin guitars since I was a teenager," said Ripsam. "My first real acoustic was a Martin guitar and it has been a close companion to me since. Martin has always been an iconic fretted instrument builder and I have a deep appreciation for the company's continued focus on quality, craftsmanship, and innovation, as well as its unique culture and history. I am honored and humbled to join the Martin family and to carry on the legacy of Chris Martin and his predecessors."

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