Page breaks finger, show will go on December 10th

When you try to recapture the thunder of the gods, someone''s bound to get hurt. In an official press release, it was announced today that the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert, originally scheduled for Monday, November 26th and featuring the much hyped reunion of Led Zeppelin has been postponed until December 10th due to Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page fracturing his finger.

The injury to Page’s finger, which was sustained this past weekend, will not allow him to play guitar for 3 weeks. It is not clear how the break was caused.

The specialist treating Mr. Page said, “I have examined the fracture to Mr. Page’s finger, and it is my opinion that with proper rest and treatment, he will be ready to resume rehearsing in three weeks time, and thus able to perform on December 10.”

Page added, “I am disappointed that we are forced to postpone the concert by two weeks. However, Led Zeppelin have always set very high standards for ourselves, and we feel that this postponement will enable my injury to properly heal, and permit us to perform at the level that both the band and our fans have always been accustomed to.”

Fans who clamored for the tickets need not worry; all tickets for the postponed November 26th show will be valid for the rescheduled date. For those customers unable to attend the rescheduled concert on December 10th, promoters are offering a full refund of the ticket price -- £125, or approximately $260 U.S. -- prior to noon (UK time) on November 14th 2007. Any tickets made available as a result of refunds will be offered to ballot winners selected at random from original registrations after the 15th of November.

Please refer to ahmettribute.com for information on how to obtain a refund and for further information.

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