Week #4 is here! You could WIN pedals from one of SIX great brands... including a whole new pedal lineup from Pigtronix!

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Name: Cary Cummings

Location: Seattle, Washington
Guitar: Olde Skully

As we approach Halloween, the power of the skull only increases! A Seattle guitarist makes a guitar for his everyday macabre needs.

“It is not my intention to be fulsome, but I confess that I covet your skull.”
—Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles

Greetings to all my fellow guitar brethren! My name is Cary and I’m a guitar addict. I was bitten and smitten with the “guitar bug” as a kid, and the fascination has remained constant, even getting stronger over time.

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What happens when you mix major, minor, and the blues?

Intermediate

Intermediate

  • Develop a better understanding of the blues scale.
  • Create lines that move between major and minor.
  • Understand the intervallic makeup of various scales.
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Sure, we’ve all heard the blues scale many times. It’s deeply connected to the language of modern guitar. It’s a scale that is versatile, adaptable, and in some cases, overused. We all have practiced it until our fingers became blistered. However, we always need to revisit it and refine our technique. Blues scales are used in so many genres including rock, country, bluegrass, funk, jazz, metal, and beyond. No matter what style of music you’re playing, it will serve you well to have this concept down. But parallel blues scales can help open your ear and fingers to new musical explorations within mostly well-worn paths.
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