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Budda Amplification Bully Amplifier Head Shipping Now

Budda Amplification Bully Amplifier Head Shipping Now
Budda's 120-watt Bully head

Budda Amps shipping their newest 120-watt head: the Bully.

Meridian, MS (August 15, 2013) -- Industry leading boutique amplifier manufacturer Budda Amplification announces shipping availability of the Bully guitar amplifier head. Featuring Budda’s extensive array of features, the all-tube Bully head is a high-gain juggernaut that exceeds the demands of the world’s most serious players.

“The Bully is the ultimate amplifier for the studio or touring musician,” said Fred Poole, Budda General Manager of Product Development. “You want every tone you can think of in one amp? This is it. Plus, the build quality represents a new level of reliability for boutique tube amplifiers.”

The Budda Bully features 3 channels: clean, rhythm and lead, all with independent 3-band EQ, reverb control, effects loops with send and return levels, plus separate resonance and presence controls. With a 120-Watt power section driven by four EL-34 tubes, and a preamp consisting of seven dual triode 12AX7 tubes, the Bully also features dual 5U4 rectifier tubes and a solid-state rectifier. Budda's patent-pending PowerPan™ variable rectification control allows players to open uncharted tone territory by selecting tube rectification, diode rectification or anywhere between the two.

The Budda Bully also features a ½ power switch for operating the amplifier in either ½ power or full power mode. Using the ½ power switch along with the PowerPan feature allows the output of the amp to vary between 25 and 120 Watts for amazing versatility. The Bully even contains a backup rectifier tube in case of tube failure.

Each channel also features a footswitchable lead boost called Over-Boost that is 100% tube driven. The back panel features an amplifier chain section with a power-amp in/preamp-out jack and a slave output, impedance selector and MIDI in/through for use in professional MIDI switching rigs. The rugged Bully can withstand years of hard touring with its high-quality and built-for-the-road construction.

With high-level features and an almost endless array of tones, the Budda Bully can suit the needs of today’s most versatile players.

Budda Bully Features:

  • High quality audio grade resistors and poly caps throughout
  • MIDI control over channel switching with MIDI IN/THROUGH jacks
  • Slave output plus Power-amp input/Pre-amp output
  • Separate spring reverb control on each channel
  • Specially designed 10-button multi-function footcontroller (included)
  • 3 channels, clean, rhythm and lead
  • Separate 3 band passive EQ on each channel
  • Silent LDR MIDI channel switching
  • Separate resonance & presence controls on each channel
  • 4xEL34 120w power section, 7x12AX7 preamp section and 2 5U4 rectifier tubes for rectifier tube failure back-up
  • LED indication of correct output tube biasing
  • Footswitchable Master Boost with user defined boost level
  • Rectifier can use 5U4, 5A4 or GZ34 tubes
  • 'Overboost' feature on each channel
  • High and low level 1/4" inputs
  • Power amp can use 6L6GC or EL34 tubes (plus KT66, KT88 5881 and 6CA7 with re-biasing)
  • Separate effects loops on each channel with send and return level adjustments. Channel 2's loop can be used as global loop
  • Patent pending PowerPan rectifier selector knob
  • Ceramic tube sockets
  • Rear panel impedance selector
  • Massive custom designed output transformer
  • Stores 9 custom presets, and provides extensive MIDI control for automation

Pricing information: $2,499

For more information:
Budda

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