Both pedals are powered by a 12AX7 preamp tube.

Friedman

Huntington Park, CA (April 4, 2017) -- If you're addicted to Fuzz pedals, the Fuzz Fiend may be the ultimate fix. Unlike many pedals that strive to emulate the tone and signal path of a tube using solid-state or digital circuitry, the Friedman Fuzz Fiend has an actual high voltage (220 volt) driven 12AX7A preamp tube. The tube delivers a natural feel, which compresses, clips and has more harmonics than any solid-state signal path pedal in production.

The Fuzz Fiend takes you on journey from light fuzz to all-out mayhem via Dave's unique rage switch. The fuzz knob, as turned clock-wise, makes the signal more square waved and saturated. Where the fuzz controls ends - the rage switch begins. The rage switch, when pressed down, causes the Fuzz Fiend’s circuit to become unstable, resulting in endless sustain and mayhem. Rolling down the volume of your guitar transforms sustain into oscillation. While the momentary push button switch is pressed down and the fuzz control is turned, you will hear the oscillation dramatically change pitch. You can further shape the tone of the Fuzz Fiend using the Bass, Midrange and Treble controls which are a true tube preamp style tone stack.

Since tubes require more current to operate than transistors, this pedal requires a specific power supply source with at least 350-400mA of current. If your power supply does not have this amount of juice, a universal 12V power supply is included.

Features:

  • 12AX7 Tube Fuzz Pedal
  • Fuzz, Bass Middle, Treble and Volume Controls
  • Rage Momentary Switch
  • True Bypass
  • Included Universal 12V Power Supply
  • Voltage Requirements: 9-12vDC - Minimum of 350-400mA of current
  • Built in USA
  • Dimensions: 4.5" x 5.5" x 3"
  • Weight: 1 lbs.

Many pedals strive to emulate the tone and signal path of a tube using solid-state or digital circuitry. The Friedman Motor City Drive has an actual high voltage (220 volt) driven 12AX7A preamp tube. The result is a true natural feeling pedal, unlike any solid state-signal path pedal in production. The 12AX7 naturally compresses, clips and adds more harmonically rich tone than most transistor or digital devices.

Named after Dave Friedman's home town, the Motor City Drive delivers rich tube tone that takes you from light overdrive to rich higher gain tones, that sustains for days.

The wide-range gain knob allows you to dial in the right amount of saturation and distortion while the Bass, Midrange and Treble controls are a true tube preamp style tone stack.

Since tubes require more current to operate than transistors, this pedal requires a specific power supply source with at least 350-400mA of current. If your power supply does not have this amount of juice, a universal 12V power supply is included.

Features:

  • 12AX7 Tube Overdrive Pedal
  • Gain, Bass Middle, Treble and Volume Controls.
  • True Bypass
  • Included Universal 12V Power Supply
  • Voltage Requirements: 9-12vDC - Minimum of 350-400mA of current
  • Built in USA
  • Dimensions: 4.5" x 5.5" x 3"
  • Weight: 1 lbs.

Watch a demo of both pedals:

For more information:
Friedman Amplification

A few simple chords is all it takes.

Beginner

Beginner

  • Learn to play a 12-bar blues, in three different keys, using one shape.
  • Study an assortment of strumming and picking patterns.
  • Gain a basic understanding of the 12-bar blues form.
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As usual, there is more to this lesson than the title implies. We will be working with one chord shape at a time, but over the course of the lesson we’ll study three different shapes. The final example in this lesson incorporates all three shapes to demonstrate how a few basic ideas can provide us with infinite possibilities.

It is important to know that for every chord name in this lesson there are countless shapes—also known as fingerings or voicings—available. For this lesson, I chose what I consider to be the most practical and flexible shapes.

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See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

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