Blue Book Releases 14th Edition Electric and Acoustic Guitar Valuation Books

Covering both vintage and modern guitars, acoustic flattops and archtops, hollowbody and solidbody electrics, as well as basses, these books are all encompassing.

Minneapolis, MN (October 17, 2012) – The new 14th Editions of the Blue Book of Acoustic Guitars and Blue Book of Electric Guitars provide detailed information and current real-world values on guitars and basses.

With over a combined 2,200 pages and thousands of guitars listed, these books are the industry leaders for guitar values and information. Covering both vintage and modern guitars, acoustic flattops and archtops, hollowbody and solidbody electrics, as well as basses, these books are all encompassing. Features:

  • Over 1,300 individual guitar manufacturers/luthiers/distributors and nearly 20,000 individually listed guitars are included
  • Over 10,000 color images available for viewing on their website for free
  • Vintage guitar/bass values updated for the volatile used guitar market
  • New manufacturers and models included through 2012

Major trademarks including Fender, Gibson, Martin, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, Yamaha, Ovation, Taylor, Alvarez, Epiphone, Takamine, Washburn, Gretsch, and Guild are covered in detail as well as many independent luthiers and custom builders. Also, separate 16-page Photo Grading System sections in each book help the reader correctly identify the condition of their guitar, which ultimately determines the value.

The 14th Edition Blue Book of Acoustic Guitars has an MSRP of $29.95 and the 14th Edition Blue Book of Electric Guitars has an MSRP of $39.95. These Blue Books will be available in the first week of November through major bookstores, music stores.

For more information:
Blue Book of Guitar Values

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