Fender Introduces '65 Deluxe Reverb Head and '57 Deluxe Head

Fender updates two classic amps.

Scottsdale, AZ (January 8, 2014) -- Fender is proud to offer fresh takes on two perennial favorites, the ’65 Deluxe Reverb Head and ’57 Deluxe Amp.

The ’65 Deluxe Reverb Head amp in classic Black is perfect for rock, country or blues players who want a moderately powered amp they can crank up at the gig or in the studio. Featuring 22 watts of tube power, the ’65 Deluxe Reverb head offers two 6V6 Groove Tubes output tubes, one 5AR4 rectifier tube, four 12AX7 preamp tubes, two 12AT7 tubes, dual channels (normal and vibrato), tube-driven Fender reverb, tube vibrato and two-button footswitch for reverb and vibrato one-off.

The original Fender Deluxe of the 1950s was a medium-powered amp designed to let guitarists hold their own in small groups. As blues, western and rockabilly bands got louder and wilder, the overdriven tone of the cranked-up Deluxe found its way into countless smoking hot live performances and recordings sessions.

Originals are getting hard to find and continue to appreciate in the vintage collector’s market, but players who enjoy the original tone, feel, and vibe will love the ’57 Deluxe. As part of Fender’s prestigious Custom series of all-tube amps with hand-wired circuitry and premium components, the ’57 Deluxe is also available in head form so players can use it with their favorite cabinet.

Lower settings of the “chicken head” volume control result in harmonically rich clean tones perfect for authentic vintage rock, blues and country. Cranked up, the Deluxe’s thick and wildly distorted tone is not only inspiring, but also just plain fun. And with all that that natural compression, it’s a great recording amp, too.

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