More photos from the Montreal Guitar Show

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Benedetto brought a bevy of instruments to Montreal, including a 16" Sinfonietta as well as La Venezia, Bravo Elite, Bambino Elite and Andy Elite models.
Video Interview






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Mike Baranik uses exotic woods and innovative features to build guitars at his shop in California.




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Canadian Benoit Raby specializes in the art of classical and flamenco guitar making, but also makes a fretless instrument known as the oud.





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“The Black Cherry” by Montreal’s own Michael Greenfield, with inlay work by Larry Robinson, was also made for Jacques-André Dupont’s Red Guitar collection.
Video Interview




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Canadian Jeremy Clark of 52 Instrument Company displays his penchant for yellow cedar and Indian rosewood.




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French self-taught luthier Olivier Fanton d’Andon is known for his elegant designs and balanced tones.




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Galloup Guitars of Big Rapids, Michigan is a full service guitar facility where budding luthiers can learn the craft of guitar making. Custom guitars made at Galloup include small body guitars, baritones and everything inbetween.




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French luthier Christophe Grellier makes flat tops, archops and Weissenborns.




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Canadian Peter Hopkins is known for his modern interpretations of the archtop. Here is the “Red Tessa Nova” Jacques-Andre Dupont commissioned for the Red Archtop collection.




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Candian luthier Josh House specializes in steel string flat tops. This Piedmont (L-00) Pro has a Monkey Pod back and sides.




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Sigmund Johannessen is a Norwegian who immigrated to Canada. He specializes in hand-carved archtops.




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Canadian luthier Tony Karol builds custom guitars at his shop in Mississauga.




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Canadian Michael Kennedy is making guitars under the Indian Hill Guitar Company name. Kennedy completed a three-year apprenticeship with master luthier Sergei de Jonge.




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Kopo’s Fred Pons uses wood, carbon- and metal-based materials to create unique, ergonomic instruments, including these Malaga models.




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Lance Kragenbrink specializes in contemporary fingerstyle guitars, which he builds in his Vandercook Lake, MI, studio. This is his OM Fingerstylist.




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Canadian William “Grit” Laskin is the only instrument maker to have received Canada’s highest craft honor, the Saidye Bronfman Award For Excellence. Here is a close-up of Laskin’s “JATP 49,” his tribute to Oscar Peterson.




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In addition to building Gibson-style mandolins and D’Angelico replicas, Michael Lewis makes archtops of his own design. This one, “La Petite Rougette” is part of Jacques-André Dupont’s Red Guitar collection.




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Patrick Mailloux of Canada makes high-end classical and romantic guitars. This model has an Engelman Spruce top and cocobolo back and sides.




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Japanese luthier Michihiro Matsuda turned heads with his innovative designs. Matsuda studied under Ervin Somogyi and Frank Ford.




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New York’s Christian Mirabella is a top restorer of vintage archtops. His Trap Door guitar features sliding doors to alter the acoustic properties of the instrument.




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Edward Klein’s elliptical guitar project was supported by a grant from the Ontario Arts Council.




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Erich Soloman uses European spruce and European maple to build guitars one at a time in Epping, New Hampshire.




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Rolf Spuler is a Swiss-based luthier and engineer. He is shown here with his Paradis models, which are equipped with his proprietary undersaddle pickup system.





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Talk about a Sweet Rosette! (Sorry, couldn’t resist) US luthier Blair Sweet uses choice woods for a balanced acoustic tone. Rosette options include wood designs, bwb lam and abalone.




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Canadian Judy Threet specializes in small-bodied guitars which she adorns with creative and life-like inlays. Video Interview




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This instrument is the product of research on experimental classical guitars conducted by Florian Vorreiter in his Winnipeg workshop.




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Canadian Joseph Yanuziello doesn’t stop at traditional flat top guitars – he also makes resophonics, and various electric mandolins (including mandolas and mandocellos). This year he brought a bass, too.
Video Interview




Multiple modulation modes and malleable voices cement a venerable pedal’s classic status.

Huge range of mellow to immersive modulation sounds. Easy to use. Stereo output. Useful input gain control.

Can sound thin compared to many analog chorus and flange classics.

$149

TC Electronic SCF Gold
tcelectronic.com

4.5
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4.5
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When you consider stompboxes that have achieved ubiquity and longevity, images of Tube Screamers, Big Muffs, or Boss’ DD series delays probably flash before your eyes. It’s less likely that TC Electronic’s Stereo Chorus Flanger comes to mind. But when you consider that its fundamental architecture has remained essentially unchanged since 1976 and that it has consistently satisfied persnickety tone hounds like Eric Johnson, it’s hard to not be dazzled by its staying power—or wonder what makes it such an indispensable staple for so many players.

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While Monolord has no shortage of the dark and heavy, guitarist and vocalist Thomas V Jäger comes at it from a perspective more common to pop songsmiths.

Photo by Chad Kelco

Melodies, hooks, clean tones, and no guitar solos. Are we sure this Elliott Smith fan fronts a doom-metal band? (We’re sure!)

Legend has it the name Monolord refers to a friend of the band with the same moniker who lost hearing in his left ear, and later said it didn’t matter if the band recorded anything in stereo, because he could not hear it anyway. It’s a funny, though slightly tragic, bit of backstory, but that handle is befitting in yet another, perhaps even more profound, way. Doom and stoner metal are arguably the torch-bearing subgenres for hard rock guitar players, and if any band seems to hold the keys to the castle at this moment, it’s Monolord.

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