PG's Shawn Hammond is On Location at the 2010 NY Amp Show where he visits a room shared by Audio Kitchen and Probett Guitars. In this segment, we get to hear and see the Probett Rapide and Audio Kitchen Big Chopper in action. The first in a line of Audio Kitchen's amplifiers, the Little Chopper was created on a need to record with a small amp that still produced AC30-type tones at a sensible volume. It comes with ECC81 and ECC83 preamp tubes and an EL84 power tube. The head can be housed by an exposed wood enclosure or with standard tolex. The controls include Gain, Bottom, Middle, Top, Stack, and Power. Also, it has Brite and Hi switches. Audio Kitchen's two-channel Big Chopper is the bigger, bulkier brother to the Little Chopper. The first channel controls are Gain, Bottom, Middle, Top, Stack, and the second channel controls are Gain, Bottom, and Top. It has a Power control for both channels. The Power when turned full clockwise it behaves like a standard non-master volume amp, but as the continuously variable control is wound counterclockwise, it decreases the headroom of the power amp, introducing harmonic distortion in the power amp and reducing the volume. This particular model is currently in the studio with Kings of Leon lead guitarist Matt Followill. Look closely and you can see a few switches with Matt's name on them as they are his preferred tones/settings. Damian of Probett Guitars describes his models his twisted take on a few of the classics. All of Probett's guitars are named after vintage European motorcycles. The first is the 25.5" scale International H, with a single-chamber body, under-wound Lollar '50s P-90s and Hipshot trem. The other two models are variations on the Rapide 5.9. The one in the center has a solid carved Honduran mahogany body, Lollar P-90s, a Les Paul-style neck joint and scale length. The other Rapide 5.9 has a Honduran mahogany body, but with a carved maple top, and Häussel humbuckers.



PG's Shawn Hammond is On Location at the 2010 NY Amp Show where he visits a room shared by Audio Kitchen and Probett Guitars. In this segment, we get to hear and see the Probett Rapide and Audio Kitchen Big Chopper in action.

The first in a line of Audio Kitchen's amplifiers, the Little Chopper was created on a need to record with a small amp that still produced AC30-type tones at a sensible volume. It comes with ECC81 and ECC83 preamp tubes and an EL84 power tube. The head can be housed by an exposed wood enclosure or with standard tolex. The controls include Gain, Bottom, Middle, Top, Stack, and Power. Also, it has Brite and Hi switches.

Audio Kitchen's two-channel Big Chopper is the bigger, bulkier brother to the Little Chopper. The first channel controls are Gain, Bottom, Middle, Top, Stack, and the second channel controls are Gain, Bottom, and Top. It has a Power control for both channels. The Power when turned full clockwise it behaves like a standard non-master volume amp, but as the continuously variable control is wound counterclockwise, it decreases the headroom of the power amp, introducing harmonic distortion in the power amp and reducing the volume. This particular model is currently in the studio with Kings of Leon lead guitarist Matt Followill. Look closely and you can see a few switches with Matt's name on them as they are his preferred tones/settings.

Damian of Probett Guitars describes his models his twisted take on a few of the classics. All of Probett's guitars are named after vintage European motorcycles. The first is the 25.5" scale International H, with a single-chamber body, under-wound Lollar '50s P-90s and Hipshot trem. The other two models are variations on the Rapide 5.9. The one in the center has a solid carved Honduran mahogany body, Lollar P-90s, a Les Paul-style neck joint and scale length. The other Rapide 5.9 has a Honduran mahogany body, but with a carved maple top, and Häussel humbuckers.
Photo by cottonbro

Intermediate

Intermediate

  • Demonstrate a variety of drone guitar techniques and approaches.
  • Examine drone points of reference from an array of genres.
  • Learn how to use standard, drop D, and uncommon alternate tunings in drone contexts.

Playing a melody or solo with a “drone” means playing over just one note or, in some instances, one chord. Besides playing without any harmonic accompaniment, it is about as simple a concept as one can image, which also means the possibilities are endless. We’ll look at ways to use drones in a variety of contexts, from ancient to contemporary, blues to metal, traditional to experimental.

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See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

How does a legacy artist stay on top of his game? The pianist, hit singer-songwriter, producer, and composer talks about the importance of musical growth and positive affirmation; his love for angular melodicism; playing jazz, pop, classical, bluegrass, jam, and soundtrack music; and collaborating with his favorite guitarists, including Pat Metheny and Jerry Garcia.

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