Quick Hit: Dunlop Cry Baby Mini Wah Review

The microscopic new wah sounds huge, feels natural, and offers multiple voicings.

Built around a Fasel inductor, the Dunlop CBM95 Cry Baby Mini sounds fat, with a full, vocal sweep. Compared to a newer, full-size Cry Baby, it sounds every bit as good—if not better, since the internal switch lets you choose between low, vintage, and CB95 modes to tailor tones to your rig and style. I favored the way the low voicing tamed my trebly, Fender-centric rig.

Does it feel weird? Mostly not. It works and feels best with your foot situated as you would on a standard-sized wah—with the back of your arch over the fulcrum. You just have to get used to the ball of your foot and toes hanging over the top edge. You still have all the necessary leverage for slow sweeps and quarter-note funk dots, though you might miss the mass of a larger rocker during fast-twitch moves. To avoid activating other pedals, you have to be careful about pedalboard placement, too. On the whole, however, the Mini is as capable as it is cute.

Test Gear: Fender Telecaster, Marshall 1958X, Fender Tremolux

Ratings

Pros:
Fat sound and full sweep. Three versatile voicings. Light and compact. Feels surprisingly natural for most applications.

Cons:
CSmall rocker makes fast, twitchy moves harder. Size can complicate pedalboard placement.

Street:
$99

Company
jimdunlop.com

Tones:

Ease of Use:

Build/Design:

Value:

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