PG's Joe Coffey is On Location in Nashville, TN, for Summer NAMM '09 where he visits the Hayden and Ashdown booth. In this segment, we get to check out several different models of bass amps from Ashdown including the TourBus10 (bass practice amp with volume, bass and treble controls, a headphone socket for silent practice, a CD/MP3 input and 6.5" driver), Five Fifteen (bass practice amp combines a 100 watt power section with a single 15" Ashdown BlueLine bass speaker and features controls - bass, middle and treble, supplemented by a pre-shaped 'deep' switch), Electric Blue Combo (uses a 180 Watts RMS fan-cooled fast-transient power stage, and a bass preamplifier with inputs for both active and passive, an illuminated VU meter, 5 band EQ with Bright and Deep switches, a front panel-mounted balanced DI output for connection to a PA or recording console, an FX loop and a tuner/line output), MAG 300 (features a fan-cooled 307 watts RMS power section, rotary bass, middle and treble controls, a comprehensive 5 band EQ section. Additionally, front panel push switches for Bright and Deep settings and inputs for active and passive instruments), ABM 500 (575 watts RMS bass amp head, 3-straightforward rotary tone controls, 2-pairs of additional sliders, a single input is switchable for passive and active instruments with a blend of solid state and dual triode tube preamps stages, also foot-switchable is the on-board compressor and the Ashdown sub-harmonic generator which precisely tracks the main signal and reproduces it an octave lower, a front-panel mounted balanced DI out with pre or post EQ switching, a sub-bass output, a tuner output, and a FX loop) The Hayden Amps we see include the Peacemaker 40 Combo (Class A, 2-channel 40 watt combo with a 12" Hayden Custom speaker with 4-EL84 power tubes) and the Peacemaker 60 head (Class A, 2-channelThe Peacemaker 60 is a 60 Watt head using a pair of EL34 valves in the output section and 4-12AX7 valves in the preamp stage).



PG's Joe Coffey is On Location in Nashville, TN, for Summer NAMM '09 where he visits the Hayden and Ashdown booth. In this segment, we get to check out several different models of bass amps from Ashdown including the TourBus10 (bass practice amp with volume, bass and treble controls, a headphone socket for silent practice, a CD/MP3 input and 6.5" driver), Five Fifteen (bass practice amp combines a 100 watt power section with a single 15" Ashdown BlueLine bass speaker and features controls - bass, middle and treble, supplemented by a pre-shaped 'deep' switch), Electric Blue Combo (uses a 180 Watts RMS fan-cooled fast-transient power stage, and a bass preamplifier with inputs for both active and passive, an illuminated VU meter, 5 band EQ with Bright and Deep switches, a front panel-mounted balanced DI output for connection to a PA or recording console, an FX loop and a tuner/line output), MAG 300 (features a fan-cooled 307 watts RMS power section, rotary bass, middle and treble controls, a comprehensive 5 band EQ section. Additionally, front panel push switches for Bright and Deep settings and inputs for active and passive instruments), ABM 500 (575 watts RMS bass amp head, 3-straightforward rotary tone controls, 2-pairs of additional sliders, a single input is switchable for passive and active instruments with a blend of solid state and dual triode tube preamps stages, also foot-switchable is the on-board compressor and the Ashdown sub-harmonic generator which precisely tracks the main signal and reproduces it an octave lower, a front-panel mounted balanced DI out with pre or post EQ switching, a sub-bass output, a tuner output, and a FX loop)

The Hayden Amps we see include the Peacemaker 40 Combo (Class A, 2-channel 40 watt combo with a 12" Hayden Custom speaker with 4-EL84 power tubes) and the Peacemaker 60 head (Class A, 2-channelThe Peacemaker 60 is a 60 Watt head using a pair of EL34 valves in the output section and 4-12AX7 valves in the preamp stage).

Almost six decades after forming the short-lived Rising Sons, the two legends reconvene to pay tribute to the classic blues duo of Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee on the warm and rootsy Get on Board.

Deep into Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder’s Get on Board: The Songs of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, percussionist Joachim Cooder lays out, letting the two elder musicians can take a pass through “Pawn Shop Blues.” To start, they loosely play around with the song’s intro on their acoustic guitars. “Yeah, nice,” remarks Mahal off-handedly in his distinctive rasp—present since he was a young man but, at 79, he’s aged into it—and Cooder lightly chuckles. They hit the turnaround and settle into a slow, loping tempo. It’s a casual and informal affair—some notes buzz, and it sounds like one of them is stomping his foot intermittently. Except for Cooder’s slide choruses, neither guitar plays a rhythm or lead role. They simply converse.

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The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

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Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

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