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March 2011 Staff Picks

This month, the PG staff and Guest Picker Pete Huttlinger cop to their guilty pleasures.

Admit it—there are times when that you listen to a certain song or album and feel a little guilty and hope your friends and loved ones don’t find out. This month, the PG staff and Guest Picker Pete Huttlinger cop to their guilty pleasures. Feel free to email us at info@premierguitar.com and tell us what song you sing along to when nobody’s listening.

Joe Coffey – Editorial Director
What am I listening to?
Gregg Allman, Low Country Blues. Allman, T-Bone Burnett, Doyle Bramhall II, and Dr. John cover Blind Lemon Jefferson, Junior Wells, and more.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
Phil Keaggy’s “March of the Clouds.” Before airline rules changed, I rocked it during takeoff. Bursting through the clouds as the bridge hit was amazing. Symbiotic tone dork? Yes, I am.



Rebecca Dirks – Web Content Editor
What am I listening to?
Kanye West, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. West samples King Crimson and Smokey Robinson, Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon lends vocal and songwriting chops, and West and guests are powerful and spot on.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
Katy Perry’s singles. I don’t want to like them, but I always end up singing along.



Andy Ellis – Senior Editor
What am I listening to?
Danny Gatton and Tom Principato, Blazing Telecasters. Backed by tight keys, bass, and drums, Gatton and Principato duke it out, trading chorus after chorus of snappy bends and snarling phrases.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours. A perfect blend of righteous guitar, hooky songs, and amazing vocals.



Shawn Hammond – Editor in Chief
What am I listening to?
Buddy Miller, The Majestic Silver Strings. On “God’s Wing’ed Horse,” the acoustics are so pristine, the lap steel is so ethereally winsome, and Buddy and wife Julie Miller’s vocal harmonies are so serene even agnostics and atheists will be moved.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
I’m not a prog guy, but Dream Theater’s 1994 album, Awake, is full of incredible musicianship and strong songs—and the vocals have never sounded less annoying.



Chris Kies – Associate Editor
What am I listening to?
Timeless: Hank Williams Tribute. Legendary artists like Keef, Petty, Dylan, and Cash honor the drifting cowboy’s tradition with simple arrangements and true-to-original covers—it’s epic.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
Maroon 5’s Hands All Over. My fiancée spun this album nonstop last year, but after hearing guitarist James Valentine’s live chops and tone (especially on “Hands All Over” and “Stutter”)—and M5’s overall rhythm and groove—I’ve put it on my iPod.



Matt Roberts – Multimedia Coordinator
What am I listening to?
Band of Horses, Infinite Arms. It goes from folk and country stylings to really rocking your face off. Give it a spin and see them live if they’re anywhere near you. You won’t be disappointed.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
Any ‘90s music. Who doesn’t love Third Eye Blind or Goo Goo Dolls? And don’t even tell me that you don’t know all the words to “More Than Words” or “Losing My Religion”!


Pete Huttlinger – Guest Picker
What am I listening to?
Jeff Beck, Emotion & Commotion. When he performed “Nessun Dorma” at the Crossroads festival last summer, he had 30,000 people screaming their heads off, and he had just played one of the most famous arias in opera. He makes me totally rethink everything I do on guitar.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
It would currently have to be Bing Crosby and Some Jazz Friends. Bing’s phrasing was beyond fantastic and, man, he could swing.



Charles Saufley – Gear Editor
What am I listening to?
Loren Connors, Night Through: Singles & Collected Works 1976– 2004. A beautiful, sprawling showcase of the NYC guitar minimalist’s jams—from early primitivist blues to spacious, ethereal, dots-and-dashes impressionist pieces. Take a Saturday-afternoon nap to this set.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
I refuse to feel guilty about music, though my love of many ’70s light-rock classics (see Andy Ellis’ pick) has irked more than a few road-trip companions.



Jason Shadrick – Associate Editor
What am I listening to?
Jeff Beck, Rock ‘n’ Roll Party: Honoring Les Paul. There’s just something about Beck playing authentic rockabilly on a hollowbody Gibson . . . it’s some of the most pure guitar playing I’ve ever heard.
What is my favorite guilty pleasure?
The soundtrack to La Bamba has been embedded in my musical subconscious since I was 7 years old and playing air guitar along with Los Lobos.

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Gibson’s Theodore model

PRS Guitars and Ted McCarty family drop “Theodore” trademark objection, and Gibson agrees to drop opposition to PRS’s “594” and “Silver Sky Nebula” trademarks and trademark applications.

PRS Guitars yesterday announced that it has withdrawn its objection to Gibson’s registration of the “Theodore” trademark. In a press release, PRS stated it continues to hold dear and protect its long-standing agreement with Ted McCarty and the McCarty family regarding the exclusive rights to the “McCarty” trademark and to McCarty’s name and persona, first developed directly with Ted himself more than 25 years ago. After a series of private negotiations, Gibson has also agreed to drop its opposition to PRS’s “594” and “Silver Sky Nebula” trademarks and trademark applications.

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A technicolor swirl of distortion, drive, boost, and ferocious fuzz.

Summons a wealth of engaging, and often unique, boost, drive, distortion, and fuzz tones that deviate from common templates. Interactive controls.

Finding just-right tones, while rewarding, might demand patience from less assured and experienced drive-pedal users. Tone control could be more nuanced.

$199

Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

4.5
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4.5

The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

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