MXR Unveils the Deep Phase

Now shipping, the MXR Deep Phase Pedal delivers uniquely expressive vintage phaser tones with the impeccable build quality and tweakabiity that MXR is famous for.


Based on an iconic vintage circuit, the sound of the Deep Phase Pedal is crystal clear with a pronounced swoosh, scooped midrange, and a dynamic, voice-like response to your attack. Whether you're digging in for fat, fluid chords or gently evoking tranquil textured melodies, this pedal will adapt to your playing intensity. It plays very well with the low end of the spectrum, too, so it sounds incredible on bass. While the original suffered from a serious volume drop when engaged, the Deep Phase Pedal has been carefully designed to match your level when you kick the switch.

With just two knobs and a switch, the Deep Phase Pedal offers a wide range of phase tones, from subtle liquid shifting to thick, swirling turbulence. The Speed knob adjusts the effect rate, while the FDBK knob adjusts the intensity and sharpness of the phase peaks. By default, the Deep Phase Pedal runs on 4 phase shifter stages for a smooth effect. The Mode II switch doubles that to 8 stages for twice the number of peaks and a more animated texture. The MXR Deep Phase Pedal comes in a road-ready MXR mini housing that will take up hardly any space on your pedalboard.

Features

  • Expressive vintage phaser tones with fast and easy tweakability
  • Dynamic, voice-like response to your attack
  • Sounds incredible on both guitar and bass
  • FDBK knob adjusts phaser intensity
  • Mode II switch toggles between a smooth and highly textured effect
  • Impeccable MXR build quality
  • Pedalboard-friendly MXR mini housing
  • MSRP: $185.70
  • STREET: $129.99
For more information:
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