Paradox Effects Announces the Carmesí Phaser

A feature-packed phaser that can cop 4- and 8-stage tones.

Paradox Effects reveals this 2021 its most recent artifact – A phase modulator all pass filter based, taking the virtues of the classic effect and adding its own touch; 4 and 8 stages giving each distinct vocal sensations, 'Sendero' mode utilizes an envelope sensitive sample & hold, creating modulation steps with the phasing, conjuring percussive pulses, responsive harmonic rhythms, or simply a dynamic phaser.


Carmesí can generate from sonic mirages by prolonged phasing, all the way to out of the ordinary swirling phase.

One of its most interesting controls is enfoque (focus), a low pass filter arrangement that control the mix and amount of brightness being fed back to the resonancia (resonance) control, warm sub-harmonic shifts, and metallic timbres that fill with expressiveness the overall sound. A pedal with hybrid technology, utilizing DSP and analog circuitry for your direct signal, maintaining a warm voice similar to classic 70's and 80's phaser effects.

Paradox Effects I Carmesí- Artefacto Modulador de Fase

  • 4 and 8 stage Phase Modulation.
  • Unique mode 'Sendero' envelope sensitive sample & hold.
  • Analog arrangement for the Resonance control.
  • Wide low and sub harmonic frequency range on the Resonance control.
  • Analog signal path for the direct signal.
  • True Bypass switching.
  • Expression pedal TRS input controls 'velocidad' knob (speed).
  • Hand built in México.

Handmade by non-replicant individuals in the border town of Tijuana. Carmesí available May 15 2021, with a street price of $199.99.

For more information:
Paradox Effects

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