Planet Waves Introduces New Tru-Strobe Pedal Tuner

Anaheim, CA (January 7, 2010) – Planet Waves launches the ultimate stage tuner, the new Tru-StrobeTM Pedal Tuner. The Tru-Strobe Pedal Tuner is the answer to the Tru-Strobe Table tuner

Anaheim, CA (January 7, 2010) – Planet Waves launches the ultimate stage tuner, the new Tru-StrobeTM Pedal Tuner. The Tru-Strobe Pedal Tuner is the answer to the Tru-Strobe Table tuner and offers true strobe accuracy (not a simulation) that will ensure precision tuning up to +/- .1 of a cent.

With a heavy-duty, die-cast design and convenient pedal housing, this tuner will prove ideal for studio use or on the road. The readout is exceptionally clear with its large back-lit LCD display that can be seen on dark stages and equally well in full sunlight. The tuner also features an extremely simple, user-friendly circular display.

The tuner is equipped with the Buzz Feiten Tuning System Offsets and also employs six de-tuning modes for players using drop-tunings. Users can also adjust the tuner’s calibration range from A400 – A499. The Planet Waves Tru-Strobe Pedal Tuner incorporates ultra-quiet, true bypass wiring to keep the instrument’s original tone in tact

“The release of our Tru-Strobe Desktop tuner brought immediate requests from artists and fans that we should offer it in a pedal version,” says Planet Waves Product Design Specialist, Robert Cunningham. “We chose to make other adaptations, as well, to meet the market needs, such as the backlit LCD which is visibale on both dark stages and during daylight gigs, and the addition of Buzz Feiten and drop tuning modes, which are more popular than ever. We view this as our ultimate design achievement and based on testing feedback, players are going to flip when they try it!”

The Planet Waves True Strobe Pedal Tuner will be available January 2010 and will retail for $149.99.

For more information:
planetwaves.com

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