Seymour Duncan Introduces the Synyster Gates Signature Pickups

Synyster Gates Invaders sport chrome-plated pole pieces in place of the original black ones.

Santa Barbara, CA (May 1st, 2012) – The Seymour Duncan Invader has a well-earned reputation as the most aggressive passive pickup ever. It's the weapon of choice for metal, punk and rock players who seek maximum power and sustain without switching over to a battery-powered active system. 

Now this high-gain classic gets a visual makeover inspired by longtime Invader user Synyster Gates of the chart-topping metalcore band Avenged Sevenfold. Synyster Gates Invaders sport chrome-plated pole pieces in place of the original black ones. They are also offered with gold and white pole pieces. 

Synyster Gates Invaders are available in a Trembucker-spaced bridge version and a standard-spaced neck version. They're the same ones used in Schecter Guitar Research's Special Edition Synyster Custom model. Neck and bridge pickups are sold individually and as a set. 

Naturally, Synyster Gates Invaders have all the amp-pummeling power of the original Invader, thanks to their triple ceramic magnets, overwound coils, and the extra-wide magnetic field generated by twelve oversized cap screws. Non-active pickups simply don't get more powerful than this — they're passive and massive.

Pricing for the Synyster Gates:
Neck, Bridge, and Trembucker (Black with Chrome pole pieces):  $135 Retail / $94.95 Street
Neck, Bridge, and Trembucker (Black with White or Gold pole pieces):  $144 Retail / $100.95 Street

For more information:
www.seymourduncan.com

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