Shure Continues Fight Against Counterfeiting

Shure cracks down on counterfeiters in China

Niles, IL (May 21, 2009) -- Counterfeiting is problematic in the musical instruments industry and as a result, some companies have launched high-profile assaults on counterfeiters as they try to thwart the problem. Earlier this year, Gibson successfully shut down a Chinese counterfeiting operation. Now, Shure has done the same.

The following information was provided by Shure.

Today, Shure Incorporated announced it has struck another blow against suppliers of counterfeit Shure products. Following an investigation initiated by the company, the Baoshan Office of the Shanghai Administration for Industry and Commerce (AIC) conducted raids on wholesale stores and warehouses of Han Si Appliance Co., Ltd, and Run Zheng Digital Ltd. Both locations are in the Zhabei District of Shanghai.

“Counterfeiters are constantly working to duplicate the Shure logo and other product markings as well as the general appearance of the products,” said Anita Man, Managing Director of Shure Asia. “Due to the popularity and reputation of the Shure brand, they know that consumers are interested in an item that bears the Shure name.”

In the most recent raids, large quantities of counterfeit Shure E2c and E4c sound isolating earphones were seized as well as counterfeit earphones of other brands, including Audio-Technica and JVC. These raids have been officially reported and published on the public website of the Shanghai AIC. The penalties to be imposed by the Shanghai AIC are still being determined.

“The Shure brand carries with it a promise of quality and performance,” said Sandy LaMantia, President and CEO of Shure. “Counterfeit Shure products do not live up to that promise, and that damages the value of our brand. We are fiercely committed to working with international agencies and with other brands to fight the spread of counterfeit products and halt this kind of criminal activity.”

Man urges customers to be skeptical of ridiculous deals because many online deals that sound too good generally are bogus.

“Shure encourages customers to purchase our products only from authorized Shure dealers,” added Man.  “Customers should be highly cautious of Shure products that are priced unreasonably low at retail outlets online.”

In addition to anti-counterfeiting actions in China, Shure has also been continuing forceful efforts in other parts of Asia, Europe, South America, the Middle East, Africa, and the United States to cease intellectual property violations.

For more info, visit Shure

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