NUX MG 30 Versatile Modeler Demo - PG Gear Spotlight

Quality modeling and easy signal-chain manipulation converge in this compact, crazy-affordable multi-effector.


NUX MG-30 Versatile Modeler

Since NUX announced MG-300, the best-budget compact modeler on the market ever, people started noticing our TSAC-HD (White-Box) Modeling Algorithm. It offers you realistic tube amp response, negative feedback and great playability. And now, the newly released MG-30 provides you even better definition from HD to 2K!

What's more, MG-30 is the pioneer that offers power amp BIAS parameter tweaking on valve amp models, which can enhance the warmth and playability.

With 2 powerful NXP® RT processors, MG-30 drives 1024 samples Impulse Response resolution with ultra-low system latency (2ms) to give you tight and fast response. 2 premium AD/DA AKM AK4558EN 32-bit 2 channel audio CODECs realizes "high quality sound performance". MG-30 has a super wide dynamic range ~ 110dB!

"Working musicians don't need hundreds of mediocre amp models." Knowing this, MG-30 focused on 30 classic essentials, and made each and every one live up to the standards of the most demanding players. Included in MG-30's top-shelf collection are: 25 electric guitar amp models, 2 acoustic amp models, 3 bass amp models.

Need to record a bass track? MG-30 offers 3 great bass amp models and 8 bass cab IRs. Simulating an acoustic guitar sound? MG-30 provides 3 acoustic IRs and 2 acoustic amp models for electric guitar to simulate acoustic guitar sound.

Highlights:
- TSAC White-Box Modeling Algorithm from HD to 2K!
- Decent Amp Modeling with Power Amp Bias Tweaking.
- 11 Independent moveable signal blocks with optional parallel post-efx routing.
- 4" large colorful LCD with intuitive UI.
- 1024 samples IR resolution and 3rd party IR loader slot with each user patch.
- Versatile application scenes and global settings.
- Ultra-low system latency(2ms) and 2 powerful DSPs.
- Comes with NMP-2 for external foot control.

NUX
$299


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