Aguilar Db599 & Db925 - Summer Gear Slam '21

Listen to a pair of pint-sized stomps that offer a wealth of low-end tone shaping.


DB 599 Bass Compressor

The DB 599 bass compressor gives bassists the ability to control their dynamics in a simple and compact format. Tailored around the specific needs of bass players, the DB 599 utilizes musically appropriate compression ratios and attack / release parameters to make dialing in your compressed tone a breeze. Simply add in the desired amount of compression with the COMP knob, use the GAIN control to adjust your volume, and take your bass sound to the next level – that's it!

Aguilar
$169

DB 925 Bass Preamp

Inspired by its predecessor, the legendary DB 924, this discrete all-FET preamp delivers powerful broadband boost in a lightweight, space saving micro housing. Its musically sculpted two-band EQ enhances any bass you run through it, adding body and weight to your low-end while opening your high-end. With its compact design and responsive controls, the DB 925 is the perfect gigging solution for musicians on the go.

Aguilar
$149

Can an entry-level modeler hang with the big dogs?

Excellent interface. Very portable. Nice modulation tones.

Some subpar low-gain dirt sounds. Could be a little more rugged.

$399

HeadRush MX5
headrushfx.com

3.5
4
4
4.5

The allure of portability and sonic consistency has become too much to ignore for some guitarists, making smaller digital modelers more appealing than ever.

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"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

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