Vox Announces NT2 Lil' Night Train

The 2-watt Lil'' Night Train weighs under 5 pounds

Melville, NY (September 2, 2010) — VOX Amplification has added the new NT2 Lil’ Night Train to its Night Train amplifier lineup. Lil’ Night Train is an all-tube lunchbox-style amp that comes complete with a matching 1x10" Celestion speaker cabinet. Weighing in at less than five pounds, the Lil’ Night Train is truly little, making it excellent for effortless portability.

Sharing many cosmetic elements with the original VOX Night Train, the new Lil’ Night Train features mirror-finish metal exterior, cut with the distinctive VOX diamond pattern. Inside, it features two 12AX7 vacuum tubes in the preamp stage. A single 12AU7 power amp tube delivers two watts of power into the matching V110NT cabinet.

Unlike most all-tube amplifiers, the Lil’ Night Train can be run without a speaker cabinet. The headphone/line output features an emulated speaker response, making it ideal for practicing silently while enjoying all-tube tone, or for direct recording with no cabinet mic-ing required.

The preamp section features both Gain and Volume controls for adding an overdrive edge at a range of listening levels. With the Bright/Thick switch in the Bright position, the two-band EQ is engaged. In the Thick position, the EQ is bypassed for a thicker sound with increased gain.

The Matching V110NT cabinet houses a ten-inch VX speaker from Celestion. A premium (16 AWG) VOX speaker cable is included for connecting the head and cabinet while preserving superior audio quality. A polishing cloth for the Lil’ Night Train head is also included.

The VOX NT2 head and matching V110NT cabinet are sold together as the Lil’ Night Train set, which will be available in October 2010 with a U.S. MSRP of $650.

For more information:
Vox

Source: Press Release

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