Photo by Jim Wright

The timely song is based on a historical document from 1789.

(October 17, 2018) -- Bad Religion have released a new single titled “The Profane Rights of Man.” A worried look at the state of human rights in America, “The Profane Rights of Man” continues the band’s long-held commitment to incisively topical songwriting.

"The Profane Rights Of Man" featuring Bad Religion's signature breakneck rhythms, mournful harmonies, and serpentine guitar work, was produced by Brett Gurewitz and mixed by Gurewitz and Joe Barresi. The timely song is based on a historical document from 1789.

Vocalist and songwriter Greg Graffin explains, “The song is based on the 1789 document, "The Universal Rights of Man." Since we’re a band that has a longstanding tradition of championing the enlightenment, we wanted to emphasize that our society is based on a profane rather than a sacred theological justification for human rights. In sum, the song is about Bad Religion’s belief in a secular basis for the protection of human rights for all people.”

Earlier this year Bad Religion released “The Kids Are Alt-Right,” a “catchy and deeply satisfying melody-surge about new permutations of racism” as reported by Stereogum. On October 27, Bad Religion will play at the Surf City Blitz festival in Huntington Beach, CA. Bad Religion is currently in the studio working on new music.

For more information:
Bad Religion

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